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Gadopentetate dimeglumine excretion into human breast milk during lactation


Kubik-Huch, Rahel A; Gottstein-Aalame, Nadine M; Frenzel, Thomas; Seifert, Burkhardt; Puchert, Eckhard; Wittek, Susanna; Debatin, Jörg F (2000). Gadopentetate dimeglumine excretion into human breast milk during lactation. Radiology, 216(2):555-558.

Abstract

PURPOSE To analyze the amount of gadopentetate dimeglumine excreted into human breast milk following intravenous injection of a clinical dose. MATERIALS AND METHODS Gadopentetate dimeglumine was injected intravenously in 20 lactating women (23-38 years of age). Breast-feeding was interrupted for at least 24 hours. Serial samples of expressed milk were collected and analyzed for gadolinium concentration by means of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry at a wavelength of 342.247 nm. RESULTS The cumulative amount of gadolinium excreted in human breast milk during 24 hours was 0.57 micromol +/- 0.71 (SD; range, 0.05-3.0 micromol). The excreted dose was thus less than 0.04% of the administered intravenous dose (range, 0.001%-0.04%; mean, 0.009% +/- 0.010) for all cases. CONCLUSION Less than 0.04% of administered gadopentetate dimeglumine is excreted into human breast milk. The amount transferred to a nursing infant orally would be far more than 100 times less than the permitted intravenous dose (200 micromol per kilogram of body weight) for neonates. The recommendation of a 24-hour suspension of breast-feeding for lactating women should thus be reconsidered.

PURPOSE To analyze the amount of gadopentetate dimeglumine excreted into human breast milk following intravenous injection of a clinical dose. MATERIALS AND METHODS Gadopentetate dimeglumine was injected intravenously in 20 lactating women (23-38 years of age). Breast-feeding was interrupted for at least 24 hours. Serial samples of expressed milk were collected and analyzed for gadolinium concentration by means of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry at a wavelength of 342.247 nm. RESULTS The cumulative amount of gadolinium excreted in human breast milk during 24 hours was 0.57 micromol +/- 0.71 (SD; range, 0.05-3.0 micromol). The excreted dose was thus less than 0.04% of the administered intravenous dose (range, 0.001%-0.04%; mean, 0.009% +/- 0.010) for all cases. CONCLUSION Less than 0.04% of administered gadopentetate dimeglumine is excreted into human breast milk. The amount transferred to a nursing infant orally would be far more than 100 times less than the permitted intravenous dose (200 micromol per kilogram of body weight) for neonates. The recommendation of a 24-hour suspension of breast-feeding for lactating women should thus be reconsidered.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2000
Deposited On:21 May 2015 10:00
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:15
Publisher:Radiological Society of North America
ISSN:0033-8419
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1148/radiology.216.2.r00au09555
PubMed ID:10924585

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