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A guide to (étale) motivic sheaves


Ayoub, Joseph (2014). A guide to (étale) motivic sheaves. In: Jang, Sun Young. Proceedings of the International Congress of Mathematicians, Seoul 2014. Seoul, 1102-1124.

Abstract

We recall the construction, following the method of Morel and Voevodsky, of the triangulated category of étale motivic sheaves over a base scheme. We go through the formalism of Grothendieck’s six operations for these categories. We mention the relative rigidity theorem. We discuss some of the tools developed by Voevodsky to analyze motives over a base field. Finally, we discuss some long-standing conjectures.

We recall the construction, following the method of Morel and Voevodsky, of the triangulated category of étale motivic sheaves over a base scheme. We go through the formalism of Grothendieck’s six operations for these categories. We mention the relative rigidity theorem. We discuss some of the tools developed by Voevodsky to analyze motives over a base field. Finally, we discuss some long-standing conjectures.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Mathematics
Dewey Decimal Classification:510 Mathematics
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:14 Jan 2016 10:46
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:16
Number:Vol. 2
ISBN:978-98-6105-805-6
Official URL:http://www.icm2014.org/en/vod/proceedings

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