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MiR-204 is responsible for inherited retinal dystrophy associated with ocular coloboma


Conte, Ivan; Hadfield, Kristen D; Barbato, Sara; Carrella, Sabrina; Pizzo, Mariateresa; Bhat, Rajeshwari S; Carissimo, Annamaria; Karali, Marianthi; Porter, Louise F; Urquhart, Jill; Hateley, Sofie; O'Sullivan, James; Manson, Forbes D C; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Banfi, Sandro; Black, Graeme C M (2015). MiR-204 is responsible for inherited retinal dystrophy associated with ocular coloboma. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112(25):3236-3245.

Abstract

Ocular developmental disorders, including the group classified as microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma (MAC) and inherited retinal dystrophies, collectively represent leading causes of hereditary blindness. Characterized by extreme genetic and clinical heterogeneity, the separate groups share many common genetic causes, in particular relating to pathways controlling retinal and retinal pigment epithelial maintenance. To understand these shared pathways and delineate the overlap between these groups, we investigated the genetic cause of an autosomal dominantly inherited condition of retinal dystrophy and bilateral coloboma, present in varying degrees in a large, five-generation family. By linkage analysis and exome sequencing, we identified a previously undescribed heterozygous mutation, n.37C > T, in the seed region of microRNA-204 (miR-204), which segregates with the disease in all affected individuals. We demonstrated that this mutation determines significant alterations of miR-204 targeting capabilities via in vitro assays, including transcriptome analysis. In vivo injection, in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes), of the mutated miR-204 caused a phenotype consistent with that observed in the family, including photoreceptor alterations with reduced numbers of both cones and rods as a result of increased apoptosis, thereby confirming the pathogenic effect of the n.37C > T mutation. Finally, knockdown assays in medaka fish demonstrated that miR-204 is necessary for normal photoreceptor function. Overall, these data highlight the importance of miR-204 in the regulation of ocular development and maintenance and provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of its contribution to eye disease, likely through a gain-of-function mechanism.

Abstract

Ocular developmental disorders, including the group classified as microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma (MAC) and inherited retinal dystrophies, collectively represent leading causes of hereditary blindness. Characterized by extreme genetic and clinical heterogeneity, the separate groups share many common genetic causes, in particular relating to pathways controlling retinal and retinal pigment epithelial maintenance. To understand these shared pathways and delineate the overlap between these groups, we investigated the genetic cause of an autosomal dominantly inherited condition of retinal dystrophy and bilateral coloboma, present in varying degrees in a large, five-generation family. By linkage analysis and exome sequencing, we identified a previously undescribed heterozygous mutation, n.37C > T, in the seed region of microRNA-204 (miR-204), which segregates with the disease in all affected individuals. We demonstrated that this mutation determines significant alterations of miR-204 targeting capabilities via in vitro assays, including transcriptome analysis. In vivo injection, in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes), of the mutated miR-204 caused a phenotype consistent with that observed in the family, including photoreceptor alterations with reduced numbers of both cones and rods as a result of increased apoptosis, thereby confirming the pathogenic effect of the n.37C > T mutation. Finally, knockdown assays in medaka fish demonstrated that miR-204 is necessary for normal photoreceptor function. Overall, these data highlight the importance of miR-204 in the regulation of ocular development and maintenance and provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of its contribution to eye disease, likely through a gain-of-function mechanism.

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12 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Life Sciences
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:8 June 2015
Deposited On:08 Jul 2015 07:39
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:17
Publisher:National Academy of Sciences
ISSN:0027-8424
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1401464112
PubMed ID:26056285

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