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Fullerenols and glucosamine fullerenes reduce infarct volume and cerebral inflammation after ischemic stroke in normotensive and hypertensive rats


Fluri, Felix; Grünstein, Dan; Cam, Ertugrul; Ungethuem, Udo; Hatz, Florian; Schäfer, Juliane; Samnick, Samuel; Israel, Ina; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Orts-Gil, Guillermo; Moch, Holger; Zeis, Thomas; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Seeberger, Peter (2015). Fullerenols and glucosamine fullerenes reduce infarct volume and cerebral inflammation after ischemic stroke in normotensive and hypertensive rats. Experimental Neurology, 265:142-151.

Abstract

Cerebral inflammation plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and is involved in all stages of the ischemic cascade. Fullerene derivatives, such as fullerenol (OH-F) are radical scavengers acting as neuroprotective agents while glucosamine (GlcN) attenuates cerebral inflammation after stroke. We created novel glucosamine-fullerene conjugates (GlcN-F) to combine their protective effects and compared them to OH-F regarding stroke-induced cerebral inflammation and cellular damage. Fullerene derivatives or vehicle was administered intravenously in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) immediately after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Infarct size was determined at day 5 and neurological outcome at days 1 and 5 after tMCAO. CD68- and NeuN-staining were performed to determine immunoreactivity and neuronal survival respectively. Cytokine and toll like receptor 4 (TLR-4) expression was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a significant reduction of infarct volume in both, WKY and SHR that were treated with fullerene derivatives. Treated rats showed an amelioration of neurological symptoms as both OH-F and GlcN-F prevented neuronal loss in the perilesional area. Cerebral immunoreactivity was reduced in treated WKY and SHR. Expression of IL-1β and TLR-4 was attenuated in OH-F-treated WKY rats. In conclusion, OH-F and GlcN-F lead to a reduction of cellular damage and inflammation after stroke, rendering these compounds attractive therapeutics for stroke.

Cerebral inflammation plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and is involved in all stages of the ischemic cascade. Fullerene derivatives, such as fullerenol (OH-F) are radical scavengers acting as neuroprotective agents while glucosamine (GlcN) attenuates cerebral inflammation after stroke. We created novel glucosamine-fullerene conjugates (GlcN-F) to combine their protective effects and compared them to OH-F regarding stroke-induced cerebral inflammation and cellular damage. Fullerene derivatives or vehicle was administered intravenously in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) immediately after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Infarct size was determined at day 5 and neurological outcome at days 1 and 5 after tMCAO. CD68- and NeuN-staining were performed to determine immunoreactivity and neuronal survival respectively. Cytokine and toll like receptor 4 (TLR-4) expression was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a significant reduction of infarct volume in both, WKY and SHR that were treated with fullerene derivatives. Treated rats showed an amelioration of neurological symptoms as both OH-F and GlcN-F prevented neuronal loss in the perilesional area. Cerebral immunoreactivity was reduced in treated WKY and SHR. Expression of IL-1β and TLR-4 was attenuated in OH-F-treated WKY rats. In conclusion, OH-F and GlcN-F lead to a reduction of cellular damage and inflammation after stroke, rendering these compounds attractive therapeutics for stroke.

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7 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Surgical Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2015
Deposited On:08 Jul 2015 10:05
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:18
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0014-4886
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.expneurol.2015.01.005
PubMed ID:25625851
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-111401

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