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Hemocue, an accurate bedside method of hemoglobin measurement?


Rippmann, C E; Nett, P C; Popovic, D; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pasch, T; Spahn, D R (1997). Hemocue, an accurate bedside method of hemoglobin measurement? Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing, 13(6):373-377.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Evaluate the accuracy of this bedside method to determine hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in general surgery over a wide range of Hb values and to determine potential sources of error. METHODS Accuracy of Hb measurement using HemoCue (AB Leo Diagnostics, Helsinborg, Sweden) was assessed in 140 surgical blood samples using 7 HemoCue devices in comparison with a CO-Oximeter (IL 482, Instrumentation Laboratory, Lexington, MA). To analyze potential sources of error, packed red cells and fresh frozen plasma were reconstituted to randomized Hb levels of 2-18 g/dL. RESULTS In the surgical blood samples, the Hb concentration determined by the CO-Oximeter (HbCOOX) ranged from 5.1 to 16.7 g/dL and the Hb concentration measured by HemoCue (HbHC) from 4.7 to 16.0 g/dL. Bias (HbCOOX - HbHC) between HbCOOX and HbHC was 0.6+/-0.6 g/dL (mean +/- SD) or 5.4+/-5.0% (p < 0.001). Also in the reconstituted blood, the bias between HbCOOX and HbHC was significant (0.2+/-0.3 g/dL or 2.1+/-3.2%; p < 0.001). The microcuvette explained 68% of the variability between HbCOOX and HbHC. HemoCue thus underestimates the Hb concentration by 2-5% and exhibits a 8-10 times higher variability with only 86.4% of HbHC being within +/- 10% of HbCOOX. CONCLUSION. Although the mean bias between HbCOOX and HbHC was relatively low, Hb measurement by HemoCue exhibited a significant variability. Loading multiple microcuvettes and averaging the results may increase the accuracy of Hb measurement by HemoCue.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Evaluate the accuracy of this bedside method to determine hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in general surgery over a wide range of Hb values and to determine potential sources of error. METHODS Accuracy of Hb measurement using HemoCue (AB Leo Diagnostics, Helsinborg, Sweden) was assessed in 140 surgical blood samples using 7 HemoCue devices in comparison with a CO-Oximeter (IL 482, Instrumentation Laboratory, Lexington, MA). To analyze potential sources of error, packed red cells and fresh frozen plasma were reconstituted to randomized Hb levels of 2-18 g/dL. RESULTS In the surgical blood samples, the Hb concentration determined by the CO-Oximeter (HbCOOX) ranged from 5.1 to 16.7 g/dL and the Hb concentration measured by HemoCue (HbHC) from 4.7 to 16.0 g/dL. Bias (HbCOOX - HbHC) between HbCOOX and HbHC was 0.6+/-0.6 g/dL (mean +/- SD) or 5.4+/-5.0% (p < 0.001). Also in the reconstituted blood, the bias between HbCOOX and HbHC was significant (0.2+/-0.3 g/dL or 2.1+/-3.2%; p < 0.001). The microcuvette explained 68% of the variability between HbCOOX and HbHC. HemoCue thus underestimates the Hb concentration by 2-5% and exhibits a 8-10 times higher variability with only 86.4% of HbHC being within +/- 10% of HbCOOX. CONCLUSION. Although the mean bias between HbCOOX and HbHC was relatively low, Hb measurement by HemoCue exhibited a significant variability. Loading multiple microcuvettes and averaging the results may increase the accuracy of Hb measurement by HemoCue.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 1997
Deposited On:08 Jul 2015 15:11
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:18
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1387-1307
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1007451611748
PubMed ID:9495289

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