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A probable dual mode of action for both L- and D-lactate neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia


Castillo, Ximena; Rosafio, Katia; Wyss, Matthias T; Drandarov, Konstantin; Buck, Alfred; Pellerin, Luc; Weber, Bruno; Hirt, Lorenz (2015). A probable dual mode of action for both L- and D-lactate neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 35(10):1561-1569.

Abstract

Lactate has been shown to offer neuroprotection in several pathologic conditions. This beneficial effect has been attributed to its use as an alternative energy substrate. However, recent description of the expression of the HCA1 receptor for lactate in the central nervous system calls for reassessment of the mechanism by which lactate exerts its neuroprotective effects. Here, we show that HCA1 receptor expression is enhanced 24 hours after reperfusion in an middle cerebral artery occlusion stroke model, in the ischemic cortex. Interestingly, intravenous injection of L-lactate at reperfusion led to further enhancement of HCA1 receptor expression in the cortex and striatum. Using an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation model, we show that the HCA1 receptor agonist 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid reduces cell death. We also observed that D-lactate, a reputedly non-metabolizable substrate but partial HCA1 receptor agonist, also provided neuroprotection in both in vitro and in vivo ischemia models. Quite unexpectedly, we show D-lactate to be partly extracted and oxidized by the rodent brain. Finally, pyruvate offered neuroprotection in vitro whereas acetate was ineffective. Our data suggest that L- and D-lactate offer neuroprotection in ischemia most likely by acting as both an HCA1 receptor agonist for non-astrocytic (most likely neuronal) cells as well as an energy substrate.

Abstract

Lactate has been shown to offer neuroprotection in several pathologic conditions. This beneficial effect has been attributed to its use as an alternative energy substrate. However, recent description of the expression of the HCA1 receptor for lactate in the central nervous system calls for reassessment of the mechanism by which lactate exerts its neuroprotective effects. Here, we show that HCA1 receptor expression is enhanced 24 hours after reperfusion in an middle cerebral artery occlusion stroke model, in the ischemic cortex. Interestingly, intravenous injection of L-lactate at reperfusion led to further enhancement of HCA1 receptor expression in the cortex and striatum. Using an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation model, we show that the HCA1 receptor agonist 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid reduces cell death. We also observed that D-lactate, a reputedly non-metabolizable substrate but partial HCA1 receptor agonist, also provided neuroprotection in both in vitro and in vivo ischemia models. Quite unexpectedly, we show D-lactate to be partly extracted and oxidized by the rodent brain. Finally, pyruvate offered neuroprotection in vitro whereas acetate was ineffective. Our data suggest that L- and D-lactate offer neuroprotection in ischemia most likely by acting as both an HCA1 receptor agonist for non-astrocytic (most likely neuronal) cells as well as an energy substrate.

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8 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:3 June 2015
Deposited On:21 Jul 2015 13:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:18
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0271-678X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/jcbfm.2015.115
PubMed ID:26036941

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