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PET/MR in cancers of the head and neck


Queiroz, Marcelo A; Huellner, Martin W (2015). PET/MR in cancers of the head and neck. Seminars in Nuclear Medicine, 45(3):248-265.

Abstract

One early application of PET/MRI in clinical practice may be the imaging of head and neck cancers. This is because the morphologic imaging modalities, CT and MR, are recognized as similarly effective tools in cross-sectional oncological imaging of the head and neck. The addition of PET with FDG is believed to enhance the accuracy of both modalities to a similar degree. However, there are a few specific scenarios in head and neck cancer imaging where MR is thought to provide an edge over CT, including perineural spread of tumors and the infiltration of important anatomical landmarks, such as the prevertebral fascia and great vessel walls. Here, hybrid PET/MR might provide higher diagnostic certainty than PET/CT or a separate acquisition of PET/CT and MR. Another advantage of MR is the availability of several functional techniques. Although some of them might enhance the imaging of head and neck cancer with PET/MR, other functional techniques actually might prove dispensable in the presence of PET. In this overview, we discuss current trends and potential clinical applications of PET/MR in the imaging of head and neck cancers, including clinical protocols. We also discuss potential benefits of implementing functional MR techniques into hybrid PET/MRI of head and neck cancers.

Abstract

One early application of PET/MRI in clinical practice may be the imaging of head and neck cancers. This is because the morphologic imaging modalities, CT and MR, are recognized as similarly effective tools in cross-sectional oncological imaging of the head and neck. The addition of PET with FDG is believed to enhance the accuracy of both modalities to a similar degree. However, there are a few specific scenarios in head and neck cancer imaging where MR is thought to provide an edge over CT, including perineural spread of tumors and the infiltration of important anatomical landmarks, such as the prevertebral fascia and great vessel walls. Here, hybrid PET/MR might provide higher diagnostic certainty than PET/CT or a separate acquisition of PET/CT and MR. Another advantage of MR is the availability of several functional techniques. Although some of them might enhance the imaging of head and neck cancer with PET/MR, other functional techniques actually might prove dispensable in the presence of PET. In this overview, we discuss current trends and potential clinical applications of PET/MR in the imaging of head and neck cancers, including clinical protocols. We also discuss potential benefits of implementing functional MR techniques into hybrid PET/MRI of head and neck cancers.

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2015
Deposited On:22 Jul 2015 06:37
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:18
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0001-2998
Additional Information:Clinical PET/MR Imaging (Part I)
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1053/j.semnuclmed.2014.12.005
PubMed ID:25841279

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