UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Histone deacetylase/acetylase activity in total synovial tissue derived from rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients


Huber, Lars C; Brock, Matthias; Hemmatazad, Hossein; Giger, Olivier T; Moritz, Falk; Trenkmann, Michelle; Distler, Jörg H W; Gay, Renate E; Kolling, Christoph; Moch, Holger; Michel, Beat A; Gay, Steffen; Distler, Oliver; Jüngel, Astrid (2007). Histone deacetylase/acetylase activity in total synovial tissue derived from rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients. Arthritis & Rheumatism, 56(4):1087-1093.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown origin. Histone deacetylase (HDA) activity is considered to play a major role in the transcriptional regulation of proinflammatory genes. We undertook this study to investigate the balance of histone acetylase and HDA activity in synovial tissue from RA patients compared with that from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and normal controls.
METHODS: Activity of histone acetylases and HDAs was measured in nuclear extracts of total synovial tissue samples, which were obtained from RA and OA patients undergoing surgical joint replacement, and compared with the activity in synovial tissues from patients without arthritis. Tissue expression of HDAs 1 and 2 was quantified by Western blotting. In addition, immunohistochemistry was performed for HDA-2.
RESULTS: Mean+/-SEM HDA activity in synovial tissue samples derived from patients with RA was measured as 1.5+/-0.3 micromoles/microg, whereas the activity levels in OA (3.2+/-0.7 micromoles/microg) and normal (7.1+/-4.2 micromoles/microg) synovial tissue samples were significantly higher. Histone acetylase activity reached similar levels in RA and OA tissues and in normal tissues. The ratio of HDA activity to histone acetylase activity in RA synovial tissue was significantly reduced (12+/-2%) compared with that in OA synovial tissue (26+/-3%). The activity ratio in normal control samples was arbitrarily set at 100+/-40%. In addition, the tissue expression of HDA-1 and HDA-2 proteins was clearly lower in RA samples than in OA samples.
CONCLUSION: The balance of histone acetylase/HDA activities is strongly shifted toward histone hyperacetylation in patients with RA. These results offer novel molecular insights into the pathogenesis of the disease that might be relevant to the development of future therapeutic approaches.

OBJECTIVE: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown origin. Histone deacetylase (HDA) activity is considered to play a major role in the transcriptional regulation of proinflammatory genes. We undertook this study to investigate the balance of histone acetylase and HDA activity in synovial tissue from RA patients compared with that from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and normal controls.
METHODS: Activity of histone acetylases and HDAs was measured in nuclear extracts of total synovial tissue samples, which were obtained from RA and OA patients undergoing surgical joint replacement, and compared with the activity in synovial tissues from patients without arthritis. Tissue expression of HDAs 1 and 2 was quantified by Western blotting. In addition, immunohistochemistry was performed for HDA-2.
RESULTS: Mean+/-SEM HDA activity in synovial tissue samples derived from patients with RA was measured as 1.5+/-0.3 micromoles/microg, whereas the activity levels in OA (3.2+/-0.7 micromoles/microg) and normal (7.1+/-4.2 micromoles/microg) synovial tissue samples were significantly higher. Histone acetylase activity reached similar levels in RA and OA tissues and in normal tissues. The ratio of HDA activity to histone acetylase activity in RA synovial tissue was significantly reduced (12+/-2%) compared with that in OA synovial tissue (26+/-3%). The activity ratio in normal control samples was arbitrarily set at 100+/-40%. In addition, the tissue expression of HDA-1 and HDA-2 proteins was clearly lower in RA samples than in OA samples.
CONCLUSION: The balance of histone acetylase/HDA activities is strongly shifted toward histone hyperacetylation in patients with RA. These results offer novel molecular insights into the pathogenesis of the disease that might be relevant to the development of future therapeutic approaches.

Citations

87 citations in Web of Science®
105 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 24 Jul 2015
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Surgical Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2007
Deposited On:24 Jul 2015 10:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:19
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0004-3591
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/art.22512
PubMed ID:17393417
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-111770

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 416kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations