UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Contribution of growth phases to adult size


Sheehy, Anne; Gasser, Theo; Molinari, Luciano; Largo, Remo H (2000). Contribution of growth phases to adult size. Annals of Human Biology, 27(3):281-298.

Abstract

Based on the data of the First Zurich Longitudinal Growth Study we investigate how interindividual differences in adult size arise in the variables leg height, sitting height and standing height, arm length, bi-iliac width and bihumeral width. Specifically, we are also interested in the question of whether across sexes and variables the same growth phases and the same parameters are predictive for achieving a certain adult size. A rather complex pattern emerges, demonstrating that regulation of growth is not the same for boys and girls and moreover is not the same for the six anthropometric variables studied. Prepubertal growth is characterized by its intensity (average velocity) and by its duration. Whereas duration has by itself no appreciable influence on adult size, prepubertal intensity determines adult size to a high degree across all variables and both sexes. The intensity of prepubertal growth determines adult size to a larger degree for boys than for girls. For a given size at the end of the prepubertal period, a small duration enhances the chance of obtaining a large adult size. Compared with prepubertal growth, the amount of variance of adult size explained is small for pubertal parameters, and--with respect to linear measures--significant for girls only. A small duration of prepubertal growth is in the following mainly compensated by a stronger pubertal spurt (PS), to a varying degree across variables. The overall picture which emerges indicates that sitting height--and to a lesser extent bihumeral width--develop in a more irregular fashion than the variables bi-iliac width and leg height.

Abstract

Based on the data of the First Zurich Longitudinal Growth Study we investigate how interindividual differences in adult size arise in the variables leg height, sitting height and standing height, arm length, bi-iliac width and bihumeral width. Specifically, we are also interested in the question of whether across sexes and variables the same growth phases and the same parameters are predictive for achieving a certain adult size. A rather complex pattern emerges, demonstrating that regulation of growth is not the same for boys and girls and moreover is not the same for the six anthropometric variables studied. Prepubertal growth is characterized by its intensity (average velocity) and by its duration. Whereas duration has by itself no appreciable influence on adult size, prepubertal intensity determines adult size to a high degree across all variables and both sexes. The intensity of prepubertal growth determines adult size to a larger degree for boys than for girls. For a given size at the end of the prepubertal period, a small duration enhances the chance of obtaining a large adult size. Compared with prepubertal growth, the amount of variance of adult size explained is small for pubertal parameters, and--with respect to linear measures--significant for girls only. A small duration of prepubertal growth is in the following mainly compensated by a stronger pubertal spurt (PS), to a varying degree across variables. The overall picture which emerges indicates that sitting height--and to a lesser extent bihumeral width--develop in a more irregular fashion than the variables bi-iliac width and leg height.

Citations

19 citations in Web of Science®
19 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2000
Deposited On:24 Jul 2015 08:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:19
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:0301-4460
PubMed ID:10834293

Download

Full text not available from this repository.

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations