UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Ice swimming and changes in body core temperature: a case study


Knechtle, Beat; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph A (2015). Ice swimming and changes in body core temperature: a case study. SpringerPlus, 4:394.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION 'Ice Mile' swimming is a new discipline in open-water swimming introduced in 2009. This case study investigated changes in body core temperature during preparation for and completion of two official 'Ice Miles', defined as swimming 1.609 km in water of 5°C or colder, in one swimmer. CASE DESCRIPTION One experienced ice swimmer (56 years old, 110.2 kg body mass, 1.76 m body height, BMI of 35.6 kg/m(2), 44.8% body fat) recorded data including time, distance and body core temperature from 65 training units and two 'Ice Miles'. DISCUSSION AND EVALUATION During training and the 'Ice Miles', body core temperature was measured using a thermoelectric probe before, during and after swimming. During trainings and the 'Ice Miles', body core temperature increased after start, dropped during swimming but was lowest during recovery. During training, body core temperature at start was the only predictor (ß = -0.233, p = 0.025) for the increase in body core temperature. Water temperature (ß = 0.07, p = 0.006) and body core temperature at start (ß = -0.90, p = 0.006) explained 61% of the variance for the non-significant decrease in body core temperature. Water temperature (ß = 0.077, p = 0.0059) and body core temperature at finish (ß = 0.444, p = 0.02) were the most important predictors for the lowest body core temperature. In 'Ice Miles', body core temperature was highest ~6-18 min after the start (38.3-38.4°C), dropped during swimming by 1.7°C to ~36.5°C and was lowest ~40-56 min after finish. The lowest body core temperature (34.5-35.0°C) was achieved ~100 min after start. CONCLUSIONS In an experienced ice swimmer with a high BMI (>35 kg/m(2)) and a high percent body fat (~45%), body core temperature decreased by 1.7°C while swimming and by 3.2-3.7°C after the swim to reach the lowest temperature in an official 'Ice Mile'. The swimmer suffered no hypothermia during ice swimming, but body core temperature dropped to <36°C after ice swimming. Future athletes intending to swim an 'Ice Mile' should be aware that a large body fat prevents from suffering hypothermia during ice swimming, but not after ice swimming.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION 'Ice Mile' swimming is a new discipline in open-water swimming introduced in 2009. This case study investigated changes in body core temperature during preparation for and completion of two official 'Ice Miles', defined as swimming 1.609 km in water of 5°C or colder, in one swimmer. CASE DESCRIPTION One experienced ice swimmer (56 years old, 110.2 kg body mass, 1.76 m body height, BMI of 35.6 kg/m(2), 44.8% body fat) recorded data including time, distance and body core temperature from 65 training units and two 'Ice Miles'. DISCUSSION AND EVALUATION During training and the 'Ice Miles', body core temperature was measured using a thermoelectric probe before, during and after swimming. During trainings and the 'Ice Miles', body core temperature increased after start, dropped during swimming but was lowest during recovery. During training, body core temperature at start was the only predictor (ß = -0.233, p = 0.025) for the increase in body core temperature. Water temperature (ß = 0.07, p = 0.006) and body core temperature at start (ß = -0.90, p = 0.006) explained 61% of the variance for the non-significant decrease in body core temperature. Water temperature (ß = 0.077, p = 0.0059) and body core temperature at finish (ß = 0.444, p = 0.02) were the most important predictors for the lowest body core temperature. In 'Ice Miles', body core temperature was highest ~6-18 min after the start (38.3-38.4°C), dropped during swimming by 1.7°C to ~36.5°C and was lowest ~40-56 min after finish. The lowest body core temperature (34.5-35.0°C) was achieved ~100 min after start. CONCLUSIONS In an experienced ice swimmer with a high BMI (>35 kg/m(2)) and a high percent body fat (~45%), body core temperature decreased by 1.7°C while swimming and by 3.2-3.7°C after the swim to reach the lowest temperature in an official 'Ice Mile'. The swimmer suffered no hypothermia during ice swimming, but body core temperature dropped to <36°C after ice swimming. Future athletes intending to swim an 'Ice Mile' should be aware that a large body fat prevents from suffering hypothermia during ice swimming, but not after ice swimming.

Altmetrics

Downloads

3 downloads since deposited on 19 Aug 2015
3 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:19 Aug 2015 15:03
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:21
Publisher:SpringerOpen
ISSN:2193-1801
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s40064-015-1197-y
PubMed ID:26251778

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 872kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations