UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Bakterielle Arthritis? Gonokokken-Infektion trotz negativen Kulturen


Saur, N; Distler, O; Mueller, N J (2008). Bakterielle Arthritis? Gonokokken-Infektion trotz negativen Kulturen. Praxis, 97(18):977-983.

Abstract

Die klinischen Zeichen einer Arthritis erlauben keine sichere Diagnose. Deshalb sollte ein akut schmerzhaftes Gelenk mit unklarem Erguss immer mittels Punktion abgeklärt werden. Ein entzündlicher Gelenkserguss lässt sich in die Kategorien Kristallarthropathie, rheumatologische Erkrankung und septische Arthritis unterteilen. Eine bakterielle Infektion muss aktiv gesucht werden und lässt sich nicht immer zuverlässig mittels Blut-, Punktatkultur und Gram-Präparat diagnostizieren. Bei Infektionen durch Gonokokken, Mykobakterien und Borrelien oder bei einer mit Antibiotika anbehandelten Nicht-Gonokokken-Arthritis kann eine gezielte Suche mittels DNA-Amplifikation hilfreich sein. Bei einer klinischen Präsentation mit Tendovaginitis, Polyarthralgien und kleinen Hautläsionen an den Extremitäten muss differentialdiagnostisch an eine disseminierte Gonokokken-Infektion (DGI) gedacht werden. Anhand eines Fallbeispieles wird das klinische Bild, die Abklärung und die Therapie der disseminierten Gonokokken-Infektion besprochen. = Clinical signs of acute arthritis are non-specific. An acute painfull joint with effusion of unknown origin needs to be evaluated by puncture. The analysis of the synovial fluid will enable to divide an arthritis into three categories: crystal induced, rheumatological or septic arthritis. A bacterial infection should always be suspected. Cultures from blood, synovia and Gram stain do not reliably exclude a bacterial infection. If gonococcal, mycobacterial, borrelial and non-gonococcal-infective arthritis under antibiotic therapy is suspected, direct DNA-amplification can be helpful. A disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) must be suspected on appearance of tenosynovitis, poly-arthralgia and skin lesions. The clinical picture, diagnosis and therapy of a case with DGI is discussed.

Abstract

Die klinischen Zeichen einer Arthritis erlauben keine sichere Diagnose. Deshalb sollte ein akut schmerzhaftes Gelenk mit unklarem Erguss immer mittels Punktion abgeklärt werden. Ein entzündlicher Gelenkserguss lässt sich in die Kategorien Kristallarthropathie, rheumatologische Erkrankung und septische Arthritis unterteilen. Eine bakterielle Infektion muss aktiv gesucht werden und lässt sich nicht immer zuverlässig mittels Blut-, Punktatkultur und Gram-Präparat diagnostizieren. Bei Infektionen durch Gonokokken, Mykobakterien und Borrelien oder bei einer mit Antibiotika anbehandelten Nicht-Gonokokken-Arthritis kann eine gezielte Suche mittels DNA-Amplifikation hilfreich sein. Bei einer klinischen Präsentation mit Tendovaginitis, Polyarthralgien und kleinen Hautläsionen an den Extremitäten muss differentialdiagnostisch an eine disseminierte Gonokokken-Infektion (DGI) gedacht werden. Anhand eines Fallbeispieles wird das klinische Bild, die Abklärung und die Therapie der disseminierten Gonokokken-Infektion besprochen. = Clinical signs of acute arthritis are non-specific. An acute painfull joint with effusion of unknown origin needs to be evaluated by puncture. The analysis of the synovial fluid will enable to divide an arthritis into three categories: crystal induced, rheumatological or septic arthritis. A bacterial infection should always be suspected. Cultures from blood, synovia and Gram stain do not reliably exclude a bacterial infection. If gonococcal, mycobacterial, borrelial and non-gonococcal-infective arthritis under antibiotic therapy is suspected, direct DNA-amplification can be helpful. A disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) must be suspected on appearance of tenosynovitis, poly-arthralgia and skin lesions. The clinical picture, diagnosis and therapy of a case with DGI is discussed.

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Other titles:Septic arthritis? Gonococcal infection despite negative bacterial cultures
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2008
Deposited On:02 Feb 2009 11:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:53
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:1661-8157
Additional Information:Full text at http://www.verlag-hanshuber.com/zeitschriften/servepdf.php?abbrev=PRX&show=fulltext&year=2008&issue=18&file=PRX097180977.pdf
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1024/1661-8157.97.18.977
PubMed ID:18807701

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations