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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-11317

Kobza, R; Duru, F; Erne, P (2008). Leisure-time activities of patients with ICDs: findings of a survey with respect to sports activity, high altitude stays, and driving patterns. Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology : PACE, 31(7):845-849.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Physicians who are caring for patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are regularly confronted with questions concerning daily activities. This study evaluates the habits of ICD patients with respect to sports activities, stays at high-altitude, and driving patterns.
METHODS: A survey was performed in 387 patients with ICDs who were followed at two hospitals in Switzerland. The special-designed questionnaire addressed lifestyle practices concerning sports activity, high-altitude visits, and driving motor vehicles.
RESULTS: Fifty-nine percent of ICD patients participated in some kind of sports activity; an ICD shock was experienced in 14% of these patients. Fifty-six percent of the patients reported a stay at high altitudes at least 2,000 m above the sea level; 11% of them stayed regularly above 2,500 m; 4% of these patients experienced an ICD shock during high altitude stay. Seventy-nine percent of the patients drove a motor vehicle; 2% of them experienced an ICD shock during driving, but none of them reported loss of consciousness or a traffic accident.
CONCLUSION: It is accepted that ICD patients disqualify for competitive sports. However, the patients may be encouraged to continue leisure-time physical activities at low-to-moderate intensity. Staying at high altitudes and driving motor vehicles are very rarely associated with ICD shocks. Therefore, these activities that are likely to contribute to a better quality of life should not be discouraged in most ICD recipients in the absence of other medical reasons.
Results: Fifty.nine percent of ICD patients participated in some kind of sports activity. an ICD shock was experienced in 14% of this patients. Fifty-six percent of the patients reported a stay at high altitudes at least 2,000m above the sea level; 11% of them stayed regulary above 2,500m; 4% of these patients experienced an ICD shock during high altitude stay. Seventy-nine percent of the patients drove a motor vehicle; 2% of them experienced an ICD shock during driving, but none of them reported loss of consciousness or a traffic accident.
Conclusion: It is accepted that ICD patients disqualify for competetitve sports. However, the patients may be encouraged to continue leisure-time physical activities at low-to-moderate intensity. Staying at high altitudes and driving motoer vehicles are very rarely associated with ICD shocks. Therefore, these activities that are likely to contribute to a better quality of life should not be discouraged in most ICD recipients in the absence of other medical reasons.

Contributors:Division of Cardiology, Cantonal Hospital, Luzern, Switzerland, Clinic for Cardiology, University hospital, Zurich, Switzerland
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:ICD and sports, high-altitude stays, ICD, shocks, special-designed questionnaire,
Language:English
Date:1 July 2008
Deposited On:28 Jan 2009 14:40
Last Modified:28 Nov 2013 01:56
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0147-8389
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1540-8159.2008.01098.x
PubMed ID:18684281
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 3
Google Scholar™
Scopus®. Citation Count: 7

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