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Complementary prognostic value of pelvic magnetic resonance imaging and whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the pretreatment assessment of patients with cervical cancer


Sala, Evis; Micco, Maura; Burger, Irene A; Yakar, Derya; Kollmeier, Marisa A; Goldman, Debra A; Gonen, Mithat; Park, Kay J; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Hricak, Hedvig; Vargas, Hebert Alberto (2015). Complementary prognostic value of pelvic magnetic resonance imaging and whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the pretreatment assessment of patients with cervical cancer. International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, 25(8):1461-1467.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incremental prognostic value of pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and whole-body F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) findings compared with clinical-histopathologic factors in patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer.
METHODS: The institutional review board approved this retrospective study of 114 patients (median age, 40.6 years) with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I-IVB cervical cancer who underwent pretreatment MRI and PET/CT. All scans were reviewed for locoregional tumor extent, pelvic or/and para-aortic lymphadenopathy, and distant metastases. Univariate Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to evaluate associations between clinical-histopathologic factors, imaging findings, and progression-free survival (PFS). Multivariate models were built using independent predictors for PFS. Harrell C was used to measure concordance (C index).
RESULTS: Forty patients progressed within a median time of 10.4 months (range, 0.4-40.3 months). At univariate analysis, age, FIGO stage, tumor histology, tumor grade, and all MRI and PET/CT features were significantly associated with PFS (P < 0.0001 to P = 0.0474). A multivariate model including clinical and imaging parameters (parametrial invasion on MRI and para-aortic lymphadenopathy/distant metastases on PET/CT) had significantly higher concordance for predicting PFS than a model including clinical parameters only (C index: 0.81 [95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.87] vs 0.68 [95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.78]; P < 0.001). The comparison of C indices for the combined clinical and imaging model approached significance when compared with a FIGO stage model (C index: 0.81 [95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.87] vs 0.75 [95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.82]; P = 0.058).
CONCLUSIONS: In patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer, a prognostic model including combined MRI and PET/CT findings provides information that complements clinical and histopathologic factors.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incremental prognostic value of pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and whole-body F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) findings compared with clinical-histopathologic factors in patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer.
METHODS: The institutional review board approved this retrospective study of 114 patients (median age, 40.6 years) with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I-IVB cervical cancer who underwent pretreatment MRI and PET/CT. All scans were reviewed for locoregional tumor extent, pelvic or/and para-aortic lymphadenopathy, and distant metastases. Univariate Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to evaluate associations between clinical-histopathologic factors, imaging findings, and progression-free survival (PFS). Multivariate models were built using independent predictors for PFS. Harrell C was used to measure concordance (C index).
RESULTS: Forty patients progressed within a median time of 10.4 months (range, 0.4-40.3 months). At univariate analysis, age, FIGO stage, tumor histology, tumor grade, and all MRI and PET/CT features were significantly associated with PFS (P < 0.0001 to P = 0.0474). A multivariate model including clinical and imaging parameters (parametrial invasion on MRI and para-aortic lymphadenopathy/distant metastases on PET/CT) had significantly higher concordance for predicting PFS than a model including clinical parameters only (C index: 0.81 [95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.87] vs 0.68 [95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.78]; P < 0.001). The comparison of C indices for the combined clinical and imaging model approached significance when compared with a FIGO stage model (C index: 0.81 [95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.87] vs 0.75 [95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.82]; P = 0.058).
CONCLUSIONS: In patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer, a prognostic model including combined MRI and PET/CT findings provides information that complements clinical and histopathologic factors.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2015
Deposited On:09 Oct 2015 16:12
Last Modified:01 Nov 2016 01:00
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1048-891X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/IGC.0000000000000519
PubMed ID:26397068

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