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Psychotherapies for PTSD: what do they have in common?


Schnyder, Ulrich; Ehlers, Anke; Elbert, Thomas; Foa, Edna B; Gersons, Berthold P R; Resick, Patricia A; Shapiro, Francine; Cloitre, Marylène (2015). Psychotherapies for PTSD: what do they have in common? European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 6(28186):online.

Abstract

Over the past three decades, research and clinical practice related to the field of traumatic stress have developed tremendously. In parallel with the steady accumulation of basic knowledge, therapeutic approaches have been developed to treat people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other trauma-related psychological problems. Today, a number of evidence-based treatments are available. They differ in various ways; however, they also have a number of commonalities. Given this situation, clinicians may wonder which treatment program to use, or more specifically, which treatment components are critical for a successful therapy. In this article, seven pioneers who have developed empirically supported psychotherapies for trauma-related disorders were asked to compose an essay of three parts: first, to provide a brief summary of the treatment they have developed; second, to identify three key interventions that are common and critical in treating PTSD; and third, to suggest important topics and future directions for research. The paper ends with a summary highlighting the identified commonalities (psychoeducation; emotion regulation and coping skills; imaginal exposure; cognitive processing, restructuring, and/or meaning making; emotions; and memory processes), pointing to future directions such as trying to better understand the underlying mechanisms of action, and developing treatments that are tailored to the needs of different patient groups.

Abstract

Over the past three decades, research and clinical practice related to the field of traumatic stress have developed tremendously. In parallel with the steady accumulation of basic knowledge, therapeutic approaches have been developed to treat people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other trauma-related psychological problems. Today, a number of evidence-based treatments are available. They differ in various ways; however, they also have a number of commonalities. Given this situation, clinicians may wonder which treatment program to use, or more specifically, which treatment components are critical for a successful therapy. In this article, seven pioneers who have developed empirically supported psychotherapies for trauma-related disorders were asked to compose an essay of three parts: first, to provide a brief summary of the treatment they have developed; second, to identify three key interventions that are common and critical in treating PTSD; and third, to suggest important topics and future directions for research. The paper ends with a summary highlighting the identified commonalities (psychoeducation; emotion regulation and coping skills; imaginal exposure; cognitive processing, restructuring, and/or meaning making; emotions; and memory processes), pointing to future directions such as trying to better understand the underlying mechanisms of action, and developing treatments that are tailored to the needs of different patient groups.

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5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Psychotraumatology; posttraumatic stress disorder; complex PTSD; psychotherapy; exposure; cognitive restructuring; psychoeducation
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:14 Oct 2015 08:44
Last Modified:07 Aug 2016 19:32
Publisher:Co-Action Publishing
ISSN:2000-8066
Additional Information:A Corrigendum has been published for this paper. Please see http://www.ejpt.net/index.php/ejpt/article/view/29481
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3402/ejpt.v6.28186
PubMed ID:26290178

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