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The role of dendritic signaling in the anesthetic suppression of consciousness


Meyer, Kaspar (2015). The role of dendritic signaling in the anesthetic suppression of consciousness. Anesthesiology, 122(6):1415-1431.

Abstract

Despite considerable progress in the identification of the molecular targets of general anesthetics, it remains unclear how these drugs affect the brain at the systems level to suppress consciousness. According to recent proposals, anesthetics may achieve this feat by interfering with corticocortical top-down processes, that is, by interrupting information flow from association to early sensory cortices. Such a view entails two immediate questions. First, at which anatomical site, and by virtue of which physiological mechanism, do anesthetics interfere with top-down signals? Second, why does a breakdown of top-down signaling cause unconsciousness? While an answer to the first question can be gleaned from emerging neurophysiological evidence on dendritic signaling in cortical pyramidal neurons, a response to the second is offered by increasingly popular theoretical frameworks that place the element of prediction at the heart of conscious perception.

Abstract

Despite considerable progress in the identification of the molecular targets of general anesthetics, it remains unclear how these drugs affect the brain at the systems level to suppress consciousness. According to recent proposals, anesthetics may achieve this feat by interfering with corticocortical top-down processes, that is, by interrupting information flow from association to early sensory cortices. Such a view entails two immediate questions. First, at which anatomical site, and by virtue of which physiological mechanism, do anesthetics interfere with top-down signals? Second, why does a breakdown of top-down signaling cause unconsciousness? While an answer to the first question can be gleaned from emerging neurophysiological evidence on dendritic signaling in cortical pyramidal neurons, a response to the second is offered by increasingly popular theoretical frameworks that place the element of prediction at the heart of conscious perception.

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4 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2015
Deposited On:14 Oct 2015 13:54
Last Modified:01 Jul 2016 00:00
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0003-3022
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000673
PubMed ID:25901843

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