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How can I improve my app? Classifying user reviews for software maintenance and evolution


Panichella, Sebastiano; Di Sorbo, Andrea; Guzman, Emitza; Visaggio, Corrado Aaron; Canfora, Gerardo; Gall, Harald (2015). How can I improve my app? Classifying user reviews for software maintenance and evolution. In: ICSME 2015. IEEE International Conference on Software Maintenance and Evolution, Bremen, 29 September 2015 - 1 October 2015.

Abstract

App Stores, such as Google Play or the Apple Store, allow users to provide feedback on apps by posting review comments and giving star ratings. These platforms constitute a useful electronic mean in which application developers and users can productively exchange information about apps. Previous research showed that users feedback contains usage scenarios, bug reports and feature requests, that can help app developers to accomplish software maintenance and evolution tasks. However, in the case of the most popular apps, the large amount of received feedback, its unstructured nature and varying quality can make the identification of useful user feedback a very challenging task. In this paper we present a taxonomy to classify app reviews into categories relevant to software maintenance and evolution, as well as an approach that merges three techniques: (1) Natural Language Processing, (2) Text Analysis and (3) Sentiment Analysis to automatically classify app reviews into the proposed categories. We show that the combined use of these techniques allows to achieve better results (a precision of 75% and a recall of 74%) than results obtained using each technique individually (precision of 70% and a recall of 67%).

Abstract

App Stores, such as Google Play or the Apple Store, allow users to provide feedback on apps by posting review comments and giving star ratings. These platforms constitute a useful electronic mean in which application developers and users can productively exchange information about apps. Previous research showed that users feedback contains usage scenarios, bug reports and feature requests, that can help app developers to accomplish software maintenance and evolution tasks. However, in the case of the most popular apps, the large amount of received feedback, its unstructured nature and varying quality can make the identification of useful user feedback a very challenging task. In this paper we present a taxonomy to classify app reviews into categories relevant to software maintenance and evolution, as well as an approach that merges three techniques: (1) Natural Language Processing, (2) Text Analysis and (3) Sentiment Analysis to automatically classify app reviews into the proposed categories. We show that the combined use of these techniques allows to achieve better results (a precision of 75% and a recall of 74%) than results obtained using each technique individually (precision of 70% and a recall of 67%).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:1 October 2015
Deposited On:15 Oct 2015 14:48
Last Modified:30 May 2016 21:27
Publisher:IEEE
Related URLs:http://www.icsme.uni-bremen.de/
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:12394

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