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Cross-talk between tumors can affect responses to therapy


Devaud, Christel; John, Liza B; Westwood, Jennifer A; Yong, Carmen Sm; Beavis, Paul A; Schwendener, Reto A; Darcy, Phillip K; Kershaw, Michael H (2015). Cross-talk between tumors can affect responses to therapy. OncoImmunology, 4(7):e975572.

Abstract

Advanced stages of cancer often involve multiple tumors in different locations in the body. These tumors are associated with a microenvironment that can influence tumor responses to immunotherapy. Whether tumors and their disparate microenvironment can interact together at distance in a multiple tumor setting, through a form of cross-talk, and affect their responses to immunotherapy has never been described. Our study investigated the cross-talk between two tumors with disparate microenvironments in a mouse model. We demonstrated that immunosuppressive visceral tumors could influence distant subcutaneous (SC) tumors to render them resistant to immunotherapy. We observed distinct modifications in the SC tumor microenvironment following cross-talk with kidney tumors that exhibit a type-2 macrophage-related immunosuppressive microenvironment. Indeed, when a concomitant kidney tumor was present in the mouse, the SC tumors were highly infiltrated with M2 macrophages and had a reduced T cell and NK cell effector immune profile. Finally, blocking the M2-associated chemokine CCL2 or depleting macrophages, significantly improved the effect of immunotherapy on growth of SC tumors in the presence of concomitant kidney tumors. This work emphasizes the potential negative influence that a tumor, with a strong immunosuppressive microenvironment, can exert on distant tumors that would normally be treatment-responsive. This report may lead to a new vision of the prioritization in the treatment of advanced metastatic cancer.

Abstract

Advanced stages of cancer often involve multiple tumors in different locations in the body. These tumors are associated with a microenvironment that can influence tumor responses to immunotherapy. Whether tumors and their disparate microenvironment can interact together at distance in a multiple tumor setting, through a form of cross-talk, and affect their responses to immunotherapy has never been described. Our study investigated the cross-talk between two tumors with disparate microenvironments in a mouse model. We demonstrated that immunosuppressive visceral tumors could influence distant subcutaneous (SC) tumors to render them resistant to immunotherapy. We observed distinct modifications in the SC tumor microenvironment following cross-talk with kidney tumors that exhibit a type-2 macrophage-related immunosuppressive microenvironment. Indeed, when a concomitant kidney tumor was present in the mouse, the SC tumors were highly infiltrated with M2 macrophages and had a reduced T cell and NK cell effector immune profile. Finally, blocking the M2-associated chemokine CCL2 or depleting macrophages, significantly improved the effect of immunotherapy on growth of SC tumors in the presence of concomitant kidney tumors. This work emphasizes the potential negative influence that a tumor, with a strong immunosuppressive microenvironment, can exert on distant tumors that would normally be treatment-responsive. This report may lead to a new vision of the prioritization in the treatment of advanced metastatic cancer.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2015
Deposited On:19 Oct 2015 12:10
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:27
Publisher:Landes Bioscience
ISSN:2162-4011
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4161/2162402X.2014.975572
PubMed ID:26140251

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