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Functionalized silicone nanofilaments: a novel material for selective protein enrichment


Zimmermann, J; Rabe, M; Verdes, D; Seeger, S (2008). Functionalized silicone nanofilaments: a novel material for selective protein enrichment. Langmuir, 24(3):1053-1057.

Abstract

We present a simple and versatile technique of tailoring functionalized surface structures for protein enrichment
and purification applications based on a superhydrophobic silicone nanofilament coating. Using amino and carboxyl
group containing silanes, silicone nanofilament templates were chemically modified to mimic anionic and cationic
exchange resins. Investigations on the selectivity of the functionalized surfaces toward adsorption of charged model
proteins were carried out by means of fluorescence techniques. Due to a high contact area resulting from the nanoroughness
of the coating, excellent protein retention characteristics under various conditions were found. The surfaces were
shown to be highly stable and reusable over several retention-elution cycles. Especially the full optical transparency
and the possibility to use glass substrates as support material open new opportunities for the development of optical
biosensors, open geometry microfluidics, or lab-on-a-chip devices.

We present a simple and versatile technique of tailoring functionalized surface structures for protein enrichment
and purification applications based on a superhydrophobic silicone nanofilament coating. Using amino and carboxyl
group containing silanes, silicone nanofilament templates were chemically modified to mimic anionic and cationic
exchange resins. Investigations on the selectivity of the functionalized surfaces toward adsorption of charged model
proteins were carried out by means of fluorescence techniques. Due to a high contact area resulting from the nanoroughness
of the coating, excellent protein retention characteristics under various conditions were found. The surfaces were
shown to be highly stable and reusable over several retention-elution cycles. Especially the full optical transparency
and the possibility to use glass substrates as support material open new opportunities for the development of optical
biosensors, open geometry microfluidics, or lab-on-a-chip devices.

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28 citations in Web of Science®
28 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:February 2008
Deposited On:25 Jan 2009 16:53
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:53
Publisher:American Chemical Society
ISSN:0743-7463
Publisher DOI:10.1021/la702977v
PubMed ID:18154313
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-11348

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