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Recombinant expression of human microsomal epoxide hydrolase protects V79 Chinese hamster cells from styrene oxide- but not from ethylene oxide-induced DNA strand breaks


Herrero, M E; Arand, M; Hengstler, J G; Oesch, F (1997). Recombinant expression of human microsomal epoxide hydrolase protects V79 Chinese hamster cells from styrene oxide- but not from ethylene oxide-induced DNA strand breaks. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, 30(4):429-439.

Abstract

Styrene 7,8-oxide and ethylene oxide are widely used genotoxic bulk chemicals, which have been associated with potential carcinogenic hazard for occupationally exposed workers. Both epoxides alkylate DNA preferentially at the N-7 position of guanine and consequently produce single-strand breaks and alkali labile sites in the DNA of exposed cells. In order to study the role of human microsomal epoxide hydrolase (hmEH) in protecting cells against genotoxicity of styrene 7,8-oxide and ethylene oxide, we expressed the cDNA of hmEH in V79 Chinese hamster cells. We obtained a number of cell clones that expressed functionally active epoxide hydrolase. Among these, the clone 92hmEH-V79 revealed an especially high enzymatic mEH activity toward styrene 7,8-oxide (10 nmol converted per mg of protein per min, measured in the 9,000 x g supernatant of the cell homogenate), that was 100 times higher than that determined in mock-transfected cells and within the range of mEH activity in human liver. Styrene 7,8-oxide-induced DNA single-strand breaks/alkali labile sites (dose range 10 microM to 1 mM styrene 7,8-oxide) measured by the alkaline elution technique were significantly lower in the 92hmEH-V79 cells as compared to the mock-transfected cells. The protection against styrene 7,8-oxide genotoxicity in 92hmEH-V79 cells could be abolished by addition of valpromide, a selective inhibitor of microsomal epoxide hydrolase. These results clearly show that the metabolism of styrene 7,8-oxide by hmEH in 92hmEH-V79 cells was responsible for the protection against styrene 7,8-oxide genotoxicity. On the other hand, no protective effect of epoxide hydrolase expression could be observed on ethylene oxide-induced DNA damage with the recombinant cell line over a dose range of 0.5-2.5 mM ethylene oxide. This selectivity of the protective effect on epoxide genotoxicity thus appears to be an important factor that must be taken into account for the prediction of the genotoxic risk of epoxides themselves or compounds that can be metabolically activated to epoxides.

Styrene 7,8-oxide and ethylene oxide are widely used genotoxic bulk chemicals, which have been associated with potential carcinogenic hazard for occupationally exposed workers. Both epoxides alkylate DNA preferentially at the N-7 position of guanine and consequently produce single-strand breaks and alkali labile sites in the DNA of exposed cells. In order to study the role of human microsomal epoxide hydrolase (hmEH) in protecting cells against genotoxicity of styrene 7,8-oxide and ethylene oxide, we expressed the cDNA of hmEH in V79 Chinese hamster cells. We obtained a number of cell clones that expressed functionally active epoxide hydrolase. Among these, the clone 92hmEH-V79 revealed an especially high enzymatic mEH activity toward styrene 7,8-oxide (10 nmol converted per mg of protein per min, measured in the 9,000 x g supernatant of the cell homogenate), that was 100 times higher than that determined in mock-transfected cells and within the range of mEH activity in human liver. Styrene 7,8-oxide-induced DNA single-strand breaks/alkali labile sites (dose range 10 microM to 1 mM styrene 7,8-oxide) measured by the alkaline elution technique were significantly lower in the 92hmEH-V79 cells as compared to the mock-transfected cells. The protection against styrene 7,8-oxide genotoxicity in 92hmEH-V79 cells could be abolished by addition of valpromide, a selective inhibitor of microsomal epoxide hydrolase. These results clearly show that the metabolism of styrene 7,8-oxide by hmEH in 92hmEH-V79 cells was responsible for the protection against styrene 7,8-oxide genotoxicity. On the other hand, no protective effect of epoxide hydrolase expression could be observed on ethylene oxide-induced DNA damage with the recombinant cell line over a dose range of 0.5-2.5 mM ethylene oxide. This selectivity of the protective effect on epoxide genotoxicity thus appears to be an important factor that must be taken into account for the prediction of the genotoxic risk of epoxides themselves or compounds that can be metabolically activated to epoxides.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1997
Deposited On:29 Oct 2015 13:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:29
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0893-6692
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1098-2280(1997)30:4<429::AID-EM8>3.0.CO;2-D
PubMed ID:9435884
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-113878

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