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Ischial spine projection into the pelvis : a new sign for acetabular retroversion


Kalberer, F; Sierra, R J; Madan, S S; Ganz, R; Leunig, M (2008). Ischial spine projection into the pelvis : a new sign for acetabular retroversion. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 466(3):677-683.

Abstract

Femoroacetabular impingement may occur in patients with so-called acetabular retroversion, which is seen as the crossover sign on standard radiographs. We noticed when a crossover sign was present the ischial spine commonly projected into the pelvic cavity on an anteroposterior pelvic radiograph. To confirm this finding, we reviewed the anteroposterior pelvic radiographs of 1010 patients. Nonstandardized radiographs were excluded, leaving 149 radiographs (298 hips) for analysis. The crossover sign and the prominence of the ischial spine into the pelvis were recorded and measured. Interobserver and intraobserver variabilities were assessed. The presence of a prominent ischial spine projecting into the pelvis as diagnostic of acetabular retroversion had a sensitivity of 91% (95% confidence interval, 0.85%-0.95%), a specificity of 98% (0.94%-1.00%), a positive predictive value of 98% (0.94%-1.00%), and a negative predictive value of 92% (0.87%-0.96%). Greater prominence of the ischial spine was associated with a longer acetabular roof to crossover sign distance. The high correlation between the prominence of the ischial spine and the crossover sign shows retroversion is not just a periacetabular phenomenon. The affected inferior hemipelvis is retroverted entirely. Retroversion is not caused by a hypoplastic posterior wall or a prominence of the anterior wall only and this finding may influence management of acetabular disorders.

Abstract

Femoroacetabular impingement may occur in patients with so-called acetabular retroversion, which is seen as the crossover sign on standard radiographs. We noticed when a crossover sign was present the ischial spine commonly projected into the pelvic cavity on an anteroposterior pelvic radiograph. To confirm this finding, we reviewed the anteroposterior pelvic radiographs of 1010 patients. Nonstandardized radiographs were excluded, leaving 149 radiographs (298 hips) for analysis. The crossover sign and the prominence of the ischial spine into the pelvis were recorded and measured. Interobserver and intraobserver variabilities were assessed. The presence of a prominent ischial spine projecting into the pelvis as diagnostic of acetabular retroversion had a sensitivity of 91% (95% confidence interval, 0.85%-0.95%), a specificity of 98% (0.94%-1.00%), a positive predictive value of 98% (0.94%-1.00%), and a negative predictive value of 92% (0.87%-0.96%). Greater prominence of the ischial spine was associated with a longer acetabular roof to crossover sign distance. The high correlation between the prominence of the ischial spine and the crossover sign shows retroversion is not just a periacetabular phenomenon. The affected inferior hemipelvis is retroverted entirely. Retroversion is not caused by a hypoplastic posterior wall or a prominence of the anterior wall only and this finding may influence management of acetabular disorders.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2008
Deposited On:25 Jan 2009 11:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:53
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0009-921X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11999-007-0058-6
PubMed ID:18264856

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