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Bradysomnia in Parkinson's disease


Imbach, Lukas L; Sommerauer, Michael; Poryazova, Rositsa; Werth, Esther; Valko, Philipp O; Scammell, Thomas E; Baumann, Christian R (2016). Bradysomnia in Parkinson's disease. Clinical Neurophysiology, 127(2):1403-1409.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Polysomnography studies in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients show altered sleep microstructure with decreased level of arousability, indicating impaired sleep-wake dynamics in PD. The aim of this study was to investigate dynamical aspects of sleep EEG in PD as compared to healthy controls.
METHODS: In this retrospective, controlled study, we applied a previously established mathematical model of sleep EEG analysis (state space model) to PD patients and age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (N=64). Dynamical aspects of sleep were quantified by measuring the spectral variability of the sleep EEG (by means of state space velocity).
RESULTS: State space analysis revealed preserved global sleep-wake architecture in PD patients, but the velocity of sleep stage transitions was significantly reduced as compared to healthy controls. Correlation analysis revealed a strong association of state space velocity with arousal scores and daily dopamine agonist intake.
CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative analysis of spectral sleep EEG variability (state space velocity) revealed reduced sleep-wake dynamics in PD patients as compared to control subjects.
SIGNIFICANCE: We propose state space velocity as an objective and quantitative measure for altered sleep microstructure and as a potential biomarker of sleep alterations in PD, not accessible by conventional sleep analysis.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Polysomnography studies in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients show altered sleep microstructure with decreased level of arousability, indicating impaired sleep-wake dynamics in PD. The aim of this study was to investigate dynamical aspects of sleep EEG in PD as compared to healthy controls.
METHODS: In this retrospective, controlled study, we applied a previously established mathematical model of sleep EEG analysis (state space model) to PD patients and age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (N=64). Dynamical aspects of sleep were quantified by measuring the spectral variability of the sleep EEG (by means of state space velocity).
RESULTS: State space analysis revealed preserved global sleep-wake architecture in PD patients, but the velocity of sleep stage transitions was significantly reduced as compared to healthy controls. Correlation analysis revealed a strong association of state space velocity with arousal scores and daily dopamine agonist intake.
CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative analysis of spectral sleep EEG variability (state space velocity) revealed reduced sleep-wake dynamics in PD patients as compared to control subjects.
SIGNIFICANCE: We propose state space velocity as an objective and quantitative measure for altered sleep microstructure and as a potential biomarker of sleep alterations in PD, not accessible by conventional sleep analysis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:19 Nov 2015 15:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:32
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1388-2457
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2015.08.012
PubMed ID:26419612

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