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How are we going to train a generation of radiologists (and urologists) to read prostate MRI?


Puech, Philippe; Randazzo, Marco; Ouzzane, Adil; Gaillard, Vianney; Rastinehad, Ardeshir; Lemaitre, Laurent; Villers, Arnauld (2015). How are we going to train a generation of radiologists (and urologists) to read prostate MRI? Current Opinion in Urology, 25(6):522-535.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW Multiparametric MRI has gained tremendous importance in the daily practice for patients at risk or diagnosed with prostate cancer. Interpretation of multiparametric-MRI is a complex task, supposedly restricted to experienced radiologists. The purpose of this review is to analyze fundamentals of multiparametric-MRI interpretation and to describe how multiparametric-MRI training could be organized. RECENT FINDINGS Recently, professional guidelines have been published to provide technical and interpretation frameworks and harmonize multiparametric-MRI practice, but the question of physicians training in prostate multiparametric-MRI reading is still pending. What kind of education, practice, and training makes a radiologist able to reliably interpret a prostate multiparametric-MRI? How can findings be reported to be easily understood? How much experience is needed? How can we train urologists and other physicians to review the examinations they request? Is double-reading necessary? SUMMARY An institutional-based competency certification process for prostate multiparametric-MRI interpretation may encourage nonspecialized radiologists to qualify for prostate imaging in a standardized and reproducible way, exactly as urologists need it.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW Multiparametric MRI has gained tremendous importance in the daily practice for patients at risk or diagnosed with prostate cancer. Interpretation of multiparametric-MRI is a complex task, supposedly restricted to experienced radiologists. The purpose of this review is to analyze fundamentals of multiparametric-MRI interpretation and to describe how multiparametric-MRI training could be organized. RECENT FINDINGS Recently, professional guidelines have been published to provide technical and interpretation frameworks and harmonize multiparametric-MRI practice, but the question of physicians training in prostate multiparametric-MRI reading is still pending. What kind of education, practice, and training makes a radiologist able to reliably interpret a prostate multiparametric-MRI? How can findings be reported to be easily understood? How much experience is needed? How can we train urologists and other physicians to review the examinations they request? Is double-reading necessary? SUMMARY An institutional-based competency certification process for prostate multiparametric-MRI interpretation may encourage nonspecialized radiologists to qualify for prostate imaging in a standardized and reproducible way, exactly as urologists need it.

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3 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Urological Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2015
Deposited On:27 Nov 2015 08:25
Last Modified:01 Nov 2016 01:00
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0963-0643
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/MOU.0000000000000217
PubMed ID:26375060

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