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Adjustment disorders are uniquely suited for ehealth interventions: concept and case study


Maercker, Andreas; Bachem, Rahel; Lorenz, Louisa; Moser, Christian T; Berger, Thomas (2015). Adjustment disorders are uniquely suited for ehealth interventions: concept and case study. JMIR Ment Health, 2(2):e15.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Adjustment disorders (also known as mental distress in response to a stressor) are among the most frequently diagnosed mental disorders in psychiatry and clinical psychology worldwide. They are also commonly diagnosed in clients engaging in deliberate self-harm and in those consulting general practitioners. However, their reputation in research-oriented mental health remains weak since they are largely underresearched. This may change when the International Statistical Classification of Diseases-11 (ICD-11) by the World Health Organization is introduced, including a new conceptualization of adjustment disorders as a stress-response disorder with positively defined core symptoms.
OBJECTIVE: This paper provides an overview of evidence-based interventions for adjustment disorders.
METHODS: We reviewed the new ICD-11 concept of adjustment disorder and discuss the the rationale and case study of an unguided self-help protocol for burglary victims with adjustment disorder, and its possible implementation as an eHealth intervention.
RESULTS: Overall, the treatment with the self-help manual reduced symptoms of adjustment disorder, namely preoccupation and failure to adapt, as well as symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress.
CONCLUSIONS: E-mental health options are considered uniquely suited for offering early intervention after the experiences of stressful life events that potentially trigger adjustment disorders.

BACKGROUND: Adjustment disorders (also known as mental distress in response to a stressor) are among the most frequently diagnosed mental disorders in psychiatry and clinical psychology worldwide. They are also commonly diagnosed in clients engaging in deliberate self-harm and in those consulting general practitioners. However, their reputation in research-oriented mental health remains weak since they are largely underresearched. This may change when the International Statistical Classification of Diseases-11 (ICD-11) by the World Health Organization is introduced, including a new conceptualization of adjustment disorders as a stress-response disorder with positively defined core symptoms.
OBJECTIVE: This paper provides an overview of evidence-based interventions for adjustment disorders.
METHODS: We reviewed the new ICD-11 concept of adjustment disorder and discuss the the rationale and case study of an unguided self-help protocol for burglary victims with adjustment disorder, and its possible implementation as an eHealth intervention.
RESULTS: Overall, the treatment with the self-help manual reduced symptoms of adjustment disorder, namely preoccupation and failure to adapt, as well as symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress.
CONCLUSIONS: E-mental health options are considered uniquely suited for offering early intervention after the experiences of stressful life events that potentially trigger adjustment disorders.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPsych
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:20 Nov 2015 12:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:33
Publisher:JMIR Publications
ISSN:2368-7959
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2196/mental.4157
Official URL:http://mental.jmir.org/2015/2/e15/
PubMed ID:26543920
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-114996

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