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Propionibacterium acnes promotes Th17 and Th17/Th1 responses in acne patients


Kistowska, Magdalena; Meier, Barbara; Proust, Tatiana; Feldmeyer, Laurence; Cozzio, Antonio; Kuendig, Thomas; Contassot, Emmanuel; French, Lars E (2015). Propionibacterium acnes promotes Th17 and Th17/Th1 responses in acne patients. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 135(1):110-118.

Abstract

Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive commensal bacterium thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. Although the ability of P. acnes in the initiation of pro-inflammatory responses is well documented, little is known about adaptive immune responses to this bacterium. The observation that infiltrating immune cells consist mainly of CD4+ T cells in the perifollicular space of early acne lesions suggests that helper T cells may be involved in immune responses caused by the intra-follicular colonization of P. acnes. A recent report showing that P. acnes can induce IL-17 production by T cells suggests that acne might be a T helper type 17 (Th17)-mediated disease. In line with this, we show in this work that, in addition to IL-17A, both Th1 and Th17 effector cytokines, transcription factors, and chemokine receptors are strongly upregulated in acne lesions. Furthermore, we found that, in addition to Th17, P. acnes can promote mixed Th17/Th1 responses by inducing the concomitant secretion of IL-17A and IFN-γ from specific CD4+ T cells in vitro. Finally, we show that both P. acnes-specific Th17 and Th17/Th1 cells can be found in the peripheral blood of patients suffering from acne and, at lower frequencies, in healthy individuals. We therefore identified P. acnes-responding Th17/Th1 cells as, to our knowledge, a previously unreported CD4+ subpopulation involved in inflammatory acne.

Abstract

Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive commensal bacterium thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. Although the ability of P. acnes in the initiation of pro-inflammatory responses is well documented, little is known about adaptive immune responses to this bacterium. The observation that infiltrating immune cells consist mainly of CD4+ T cells in the perifollicular space of early acne lesions suggests that helper T cells may be involved in immune responses caused by the intra-follicular colonization of P. acnes. A recent report showing that P. acnes can induce IL-17 production by T cells suggests that acne might be a T helper type 17 (Th17)-mediated disease. In line with this, we show in this work that, in addition to IL-17A, both Th1 and Th17 effector cytokines, transcription factors, and chemokine receptors are strongly upregulated in acne lesions. Furthermore, we found that, in addition to Th17, P. acnes can promote mixed Th17/Th1 responses by inducing the concomitant secretion of IL-17A and IFN-γ from specific CD4+ T cells in vitro. Finally, we show that both P. acnes-specific Th17 and Th17/Th1 cells can be found in the peripheral blood of patients suffering from acne and, at lower frequencies, in healthy individuals. We therefore identified P. acnes-responding Th17/Th1 cells as, to our knowledge, a previously unreported CD4+ subpopulation involved in inflammatory acne.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:09 Dec 2015 16:37
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:35
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0022-202X
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/jid.2014.290

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