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R2-recanalization of spontaneous carotid artery dissection


Nedeltchev, K; Bickel, S; Arnold, M; Sarikaya, H; Georgiadis, D; Sturzenegger, M; Mattle, H P; Baumgartner, R W (2009). R2-recanalization of spontaneous carotid artery dissection. Stroke, 40(2):499-504.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We set out to investigate the predictors and time course for recanalization of spontaneous dissection of the cervical internal carotid artery (SICAD). METHODS: We prospectively included 249 consecutive patients (mean age, 45+/-11 years) with 268 SICAD. Ultrasound examinations were performed at presentation, during the first month, and then at 3, 6, and 12 months, and clinical follow-ups after 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: Of 268 SICADs, 20 (7.5%) presented with </=50% stenosis, 31 (11.6%) with 51% to 80% stenosis, 92 (34.3%) with 81% to 99% stenosis, and 125 (46.6%) with an occlusion. Antithrombotic treatment included anticoagulation in 174 (67%) patients, aspirin in 64 (24%) patients, and aspirin followed by anticoagulation or vice versa in 22 (8%) patients. Follow-up ultrasound showed normal findings in 160 (60%), </=50% stenosis in 27 (10%), 51% to 80% stenosis in 4 (1%), 81% to 99% stenosis in 26 (10%), and occlusion in 51 (19%) vessels. The rate of complete recanalization was 16% at 1 month, 50% at 3 months, and 60% at 6 and 12 months. Initial occlusion of the dissected vessels reduced the odds of recanalization (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 2.2-7.3; P<0.001), whereas the occurrence of local symptoms and signs only at presentation were independently associated with complete recanalization (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; P=0.048). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that recanalization of SICAD occurs mainly within the first 6 months after the onset of symptoms. Initial occlusion reduces the likelihood of complete recanalization, whereas presentation with local symptoms and signs only increases it.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We set out to investigate the predictors and time course for recanalization of spontaneous dissection of the cervical internal carotid artery (SICAD). METHODS: We prospectively included 249 consecutive patients (mean age, 45+/-11 years) with 268 SICAD. Ultrasound examinations were performed at presentation, during the first month, and then at 3, 6, and 12 months, and clinical follow-ups after 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: Of 268 SICADs, 20 (7.5%) presented with </=50% stenosis, 31 (11.6%) with 51% to 80% stenosis, 92 (34.3%) with 81% to 99% stenosis, and 125 (46.6%) with an occlusion. Antithrombotic treatment included anticoagulation in 174 (67%) patients, aspirin in 64 (24%) patients, and aspirin followed by anticoagulation or vice versa in 22 (8%) patients. Follow-up ultrasound showed normal findings in 160 (60%), </=50% stenosis in 27 (10%), 51% to 80% stenosis in 4 (1%), 81% to 99% stenosis in 26 (10%), and occlusion in 51 (19%) vessels. The rate of complete recanalization was 16% at 1 month, 50% at 3 months, and 60% at 6 and 12 months. Initial occlusion of the dissected vessels reduced the odds of recanalization (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 2.2-7.3; P<0.001), whereas the occurrence of local symptoms and signs only at presentation were independently associated with complete recanalization (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; P=0.048). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that recanalization of SICAD occurs mainly within the first 6 months after the onset of symptoms. Initial occlusion reduces the likelihood of complete recanalization, whereas presentation with local symptoms and signs only increases it.

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34 citations in Web of Science®
48 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:22 Jun 2009 13:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:54
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0039-2499
Additional Information:This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Stroke: a Journal of Cerebral Circulation
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.108.519694
PubMed ID:19109549

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