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Physical inactivity and arterial stiffness in COPD


Clarenbach, Christian; Franzen, Daniel; Kohler, Malcolm; Sievi, Noriane (2015). Physical inactivity and arterial stiffness in COPD. International Journal of COPD, 10(1):1891-1897.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Arterial stiffness is an important predictor of cardiovascular risk besides classic cardiovascular risk factors. Previous studies showed that arterial stiffness is increased in patients with COPD compared to healthy controls and exercise training may reduce arterial stiffness. Since physical inactivity is frequently observed in patients with COPD and exercise training may improve arterial stiffness, we hypothesized that low daily physical activity may be associated with increased arterial stiffness.
METHODS: In 123 patients with COPD (72% men; mean [standard deviation] age: 62 [7.5] years; median [quartile] forced expiratory volume in 1 second 35 [27/65] %predicted), arterial stiffness was assessed by augmentation index (AI). Daily physical activity level (PAL) was measured by an activity monitor (SenseWear Pro™) >1 week. The association between AI and PAL was investigated by univariate and multivariate regression analysis, taking into account disease-specific characteristics and comorbidities.
RESULTS: Patients suffered from moderate (35%), severe (32%), and very severe (33%) COPD, and 22% were active smokers. Median (quartile) PAL was 1.4 (1.3/1.5) and mean (standard deviation) AI 26% (9.2%). PAL showed a negative association with AI (B=-9.32, P=0.017) independent of age, sex, blood pressure, and airflow limitation.
CONCLUSION:b In COPD patients, a higher PAL seems to favorably influence arterial stiffness and therefore may reduce cardiovascular risk.
CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01527773.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Arterial stiffness is an important predictor of cardiovascular risk besides classic cardiovascular risk factors. Previous studies showed that arterial stiffness is increased in patients with COPD compared to healthy controls and exercise training may reduce arterial stiffness. Since physical inactivity is frequently observed in patients with COPD and exercise training may improve arterial stiffness, we hypothesized that low daily physical activity may be associated with increased arterial stiffness.
METHODS: In 123 patients with COPD (72% men; mean [standard deviation] age: 62 [7.5] years; median [quartile] forced expiratory volume in 1 second 35 [27/65] %predicted), arterial stiffness was assessed by augmentation index (AI). Daily physical activity level (PAL) was measured by an activity monitor (SenseWear Pro™) >1 week. The association between AI and PAL was investigated by univariate and multivariate regression analysis, taking into account disease-specific characteristics and comorbidities.
RESULTS: Patients suffered from moderate (35%), severe (32%), and very severe (33%) COPD, and 22% were active smokers. Median (quartile) PAL was 1.4 (1.3/1.5) and mean (standard deviation) AI 26% (9.2%). PAL showed a negative association with AI (B=-9.32, P=0.017) independent of age, sex, blood pressure, and airflow limitation.
CONCLUSION:b In COPD patients, a higher PAL seems to favorably influence arterial stiffness and therefore may reduce cardiovascular risk.
CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01527773.

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2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:10 September 2015
Deposited On:01 Feb 2016 11:51
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:40
Publisher:Dove Medical Press Ltd.
ISSN:1176-9106
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S90943
PubMed ID:26392763

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