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Postcoital Dysphoria: Prevalence and Psychological Correlates


Schweitzer, Robert D; O'Brien, Jessica; Burri, Andrea (2015). Postcoital Dysphoria: Prevalence and Psychological Correlates. Sexual Medicine, 3(4):235-243.

Abstract

Introduction: While problems related to desire, arousal, and orgasm have been subject to extensive epidemiologic research, women's postcoital reactions and feelings, and postcoital dysphoria (PCD) remains under-researched.
Aim: The study examined the association between women's attachment anxiety and avoidance, differentiation of self, and the experience of PCD symptoms.
Methods: Two hundred and thirty female university students completed an online survey.
Main Outcome Measures: The Female Sexual Function Index, the Experiences in Close Relationships Scale, the Differentiation of Self Inventory-Revised, and study specific questions.
Results: Forty-six percent of respondents reported experiencing PCD symptoms at least once in their lifetime with 5.1% experiencing PCD symptoms a few times within the past 4 weeks. A small but significant inverse correlation was found between lifetime prevalence of PCD and sexual functioning (r = −0.16). While the regression model accounted for 22% of variance in lifetime prevalence of PCD, attachment and differentiation of self variables did not account for significant variance.
Conclusions: The findings confirm that PCD is under-recognized and under-researched. There appears to be no relationship between PCD and intimacy in close relationships. Further research is necessary to understand the subjective experience of PCD and to inform the development of a reliable measure.

Abstract

Introduction: While problems related to desire, arousal, and orgasm have been subject to extensive epidemiologic research, women's postcoital reactions and feelings, and postcoital dysphoria (PCD) remains under-researched.
Aim: The study examined the association between women's attachment anxiety and avoidance, differentiation of self, and the experience of PCD symptoms.
Methods: Two hundred and thirty female university students completed an online survey.
Main Outcome Measures: The Female Sexual Function Index, the Experiences in Close Relationships Scale, the Differentiation of Self Inventory-Revised, and study specific questions.
Results: Forty-six percent of respondents reported experiencing PCD symptoms at least once in their lifetime with 5.1% experiencing PCD symptoms a few times within the past 4 weeks. A small but significant inverse correlation was found between lifetime prevalence of PCD and sexual functioning (r = −0.16). While the regression model accounted for 22% of variance in lifetime prevalence of PCD, attachment and differentiation of self variables did not account for significant variance.
Conclusions: The findings confirm that PCD is under-recognized and under-researched. There appears to be no relationship between PCD and intimacy in close relationships. Further research is necessary to understand the subjective experience of PCD and to inform the development of a reliable measure.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:5 October 2015
Deposited On:15 Dec 2015 12:00
Last Modified:28 Sep 2016 07:32
Publisher:Wiley Open Access
ISSN:2050-1161
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/sm2.74
PubMed ID:26797056

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