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Evaluation of influencing factors in impact analysis methodology for the adoption of cloud-based services


Garg, Radhika; Stiller, Burkhard (2015). Evaluation of influencing factors in impact analysis methodology for the adoption of cloud-based services. In: The 8th IEEE International Conference on Cloud Computing (CLOUD 2015), NewYork, U.S.A, 27 June 2015 - 2 July 2015, 999-1002.

Abstract

Technical advancements in virtualization and Service-oriented Architectures, the technology backbone of Cloud Computing (CC), along with the availability of high speed Internet has escalated the performance of CC in terms of elasticity, throughput, agility, or response time. However, according to the Gartner’s Hype cycle of 2014, CC is at the “Trough of Disillusionment”, which hints at “waning of interest as the implementations fail to deliver” [7]. The reason for this situation is the lack of a methodological impact analysis for adopting cloud-based services in an organization. In the context of CC an impact analysis is complicated due to the complex architecture of services and presence of influencing factors from multiple dimensions (technical, economical, and organizational). This paper, therefore, extends and evaluates the methodology “Impact Analysis Methodology for Cloud-based Services (IAMCIS)” that quantifies the impact of cloud-based services before they are adopted in an organization [6]. The methodology is illustrated in combination with a use-case obtained from a survey conducted with 17 organizations (with varied domain of expertise, size, and geographical scope), who plan to adopt or have adopted cloud-based services for fulfilling their IT requirements.

Abstract

Technical advancements in virtualization and Service-oriented Architectures, the technology backbone of Cloud Computing (CC), along with the availability of high speed Internet has escalated the performance of CC in terms of elasticity, throughput, agility, or response time. However, according to the Gartner’s Hype cycle of 2014, CC is at the “Trough of Disillusionment”, which hints at “waning of interest as the implementations fail to deliver” [7]. The reason for this situation is the lack of a methodological impact analysis for adopting cloud-based services in an organization. In the context of CC an impact analysis is complicated due to the complex architecture of services and presence of influencing factors from multiple dimensions (technical, economical, and organizational). This paper, therefore, extends and evaluates the methodology “Impact Analysis Methodology for Cloud-based Services (IAMCIS)” that quantifies the impact of cloud-based services before they are adopted in an organization [6]. The methodology is illustrated in combination with a use-case obtained from a survey conducted with 17 organizations (with varied domain of expertise, size, and geographical scope), who plan to adopt or have adopted cloud-based services for fulfilling their IT requirements.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:2 July 2015
Deposited On:15 Dec 2015 13:49
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:40
Publisher:IEEE
ISBN:978-1-4673-7286-2
Additional Information:Published in: Cloud Computing (CLOUD), 2015 IEEE 8th International Conference on
Free access at:Related URL. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/CLOUD.2015.136
Related URLs:https://files.ifi.uzh.ch/CSG/staff/garg/extern/publications/CLOUD15.pdf (Author)
http://www.thecloudcomputing.org/2015/ (Organisation)
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:12739

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