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Exercise for all cystic fibrosis patients: is the evidence strengthening?


Hebestreit, Helge; Kriemler, Susi; Radtke, Thomas (2015). Exercise for all cystic fibrosis patients: is the evidence strengthening? Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine, 21(6):591-595.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW Regular physical activity and exercise have become important components of cystic fibrosis care. This review summarizes the recent evidence in favour of regular exercise in cystic fibrosis that has accumulated over the past years. RECENT FINDINGS Several recently published small randomized-controlled trials and observational studies have added to our knowledge on positive effects of exercise training on pulmonary function and aerobic fitness in cystic fibrosis. Relevant outcomes, such as body posture, health-related quality of life and rate of hospitalization, are increasingly studied. Findings from these studies suggest that exercise might also be beneficial for these outcomes. So far, many important questions such as the best way of integrating exercise in cystic fibrosis care and the determination of the optimal strategies for training and motivation remain mostly unanswered. SUMMARY Over the past years, evidence for the beneficial effects of regular exercise on lung health and aerobic exercise capacity is strengthening. Despite the fact that most of the knowledge is based on small studies, the observed effects are encouraging and there is no reason why exercise should not be implemented in all patients' care.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW Regular physical activity and exercise have become important components of cystic fibrosis care. This review summarizes the recent evidence in favour of regular exercise in cystic fibrosis that has accumulated over the past years. RECENT FINDINGS Several recently published small randomized-controlled trials and observational studies have added to our knowledge on positive effects of exercise training on pulmonary function and aerobic fitness in cystic fibrosis. Relevant outcomes, such as body posture, health-related quality of life and rate of hospitalization, are increasingly studied. Findings from these studies suggest that exercise might also be beneficial for these outcomes. So far, many important questions such as the best way of integrating exercise in cystic fibrosis care and the determination of the optimal strategies for training and motivation remain mostly unanswered. SUMMARY Over the past years, evidence for the beneficial effects of regular exercise on lung health and aerobic exercise capacity is strengthening. Despite the fact that most of the knowledge is based on small studies, the observed effects are encouraging and there is no reason why exercise should not be implemented in all patients' care.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2015
Deposited On:22 Dec 2015 08:16
Last Modified:01 Dec 2016 01:01
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1070-5287
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/MCP.0000000000000214
PubMed ID:26390332

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