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The prognostic value of midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide in patients with hemorrhagic stroke


Fischer, M; Katan, M; Morgenthaler, N G; Seiler, M; Müller, B; Lackner, P; Errath, M; Helbok, R; Pfausler, B; Beer, R; Schmutzhard, E; Broessner, G (2014). The prognostic value of midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. Cerebrovascular Diseases, 37(2):128-33.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a well-known prognostic marker of outcome and mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. Midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) is a stable fragment of the ANP precursor hormone. As a prognostic marker after ischemic stroke, it reliably predicts poststroke mortality and functional outcome. This study aimed to analyze the prognostic value of MR-proANP in patients with hemorrhagic stroke, i.e. subarachnoid (SAH) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).
METHODS: MR-proANP was analyzed in patients with spontaneous SAH or spontaneous ICH. All patients were prospectively randomized into two treatment arms: (1) a prophylactic normothermia group with a target core temperature 36.5°C using endovascular cooling, and (2) a control group with conventional stepwise predefined fever management using antipyretic medication and surface cooling. Blood samples were obtained on admission and on days 4 and 7. Measurement of MR-proANP was performed in serum using sandwich immunoassay. The primary endpoint was functional outcome [assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS)] and the secondary endpoints were mortality within 180 days after hemorrhagic stroke and influence of temperature on MR-proANP. A favorable outcome was defined as GOS 4-5, and the patients were considered to have a poor outcome with a 180-day GOS score between 1 and 3.
RESULTS: Analysis of MR-proANP was performed in 24 patients with spontaneous SAH and 22 patients with spontaneous ICH. MR-proANP was elevated on days 4 and 7 as compared to baseline levels (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). High MR-proANP levels (>120 pmol/l) were associated with increased mortality and poor outcome (after 180 days; p < 0.05, respectively). There was no significant difference regarding MR-proANP serum concentrations between the endovascular and the control groups.
CONCLUSIONS: Increased levels of MR-proANP are independently associated with poor functional outcome and increased mortality after 180 days in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. Endovascular temperature control had no significant influence on MR-proANP levels.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a well-known prognostic marker of outcome and mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. Midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) is a stable fragment of the ANP precursor hormone. As a prognostic marker after ischemic stroke, it reliably predicts poststroke mortality and functional outcome. This study aimed to analyze the prognostic value of MR-proANP in patients with hemorrhagic stroke, i.e. subarachnoid (SAH) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).
METHODS: MR-proANP was analyzed in patients with spontaneous SAH or spontaneous ICH. All patients were prospectively randomized into two treatment arms: (1) a prophylactic normothermia group with a target core temperature 36.5°C using endovascular cooling, and (2) a control group with conventional stepwise predefined fever management using antipyretic medication and surface cooling. Blood samples were obtained on admission and on days 4 and 7. Measurement of MR-proANP was performed in serum using sandwich immunoassay. The primary endpoint was functional outcome [assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS)] and the secondary endpoints were mortality within 180 days after hemorrhagic stroke and influence of temperature on MR-proANP. A favorable outcome was defined as GOS 4-5, and the patients were considered to have a poor outcome with a 180-day GOS score between 1 and 3.
RESULTS: Analysis of MR-proANP was performed in 24 patients with spontaneous SAH and 22 patients with spontaneous ICH. MR-proANP was elevated on days 4 and 7 as compared to baseline levels (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). High MR-proANP levels (>120 pmol/l) were associated with increased mortality and poor outcome (after 180 days; p < 0.05, respectively). There was no significant difference regarding MR-proANP serum concentrations between the endovascular and the control groups.
CONCLUSIONS: Increased levels of MR-proANP are independently associated with poor functional outcome and increased mortality after 180 days in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. Endovascular temperature control had no significant influence on MR-proANP levels.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:21 Dec 2015 15:30
Last Modified:03 Jun 2016 10:17
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1015-9770
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000357215
PubMed ID:24481415

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