UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Volume correction in computed tomography densitometry for follow-up studies on pulmonary emphysema


Stoel, B C; Putter, H; Bakker, M E; Dirksen, A; Stockley, R A; Piitulainen, E; Russi, E W; Parr, D; Shaker, S B; Reiber, J H C; Stolk, J (2008). Volume correction in computed tomography densitometry for follow-up studies on pulmonary emphysema. Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society, 5(9):919-924.

Abstract

Lung densitometry in drug evaluation trials can be confounded by changes in inspiration levels between computed tomography (CT) scans, limiting its sensitivity to detect changes over time. Therefore our aim was to explore whether the sensitivity of lung densitometry could be improved by correcting the measurements for changes in lung volume, based on the estimated relation between density (as measured with the 15th percentile point) and lung volume. We compared four correction methods, using CT data of 143 patients from five European countries. Patients were scanned, generally twice per visit, at baseline and after 2.5 years. The methods included one physiological model and three linear mixed-effects models using a volume-density relation: (1) estimated over the entire population with one scan per visit (model A) and two scans per visit (model B); and (2) estimated for each patient individually (model C). Both log-transformed and original volume and density values were evaluated and the differences in goodness-of-fit between methods were tested. Model C fitted best (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, and P = 0.064), when two scans were available. The most consistent progression estimation was obtained between sites, when both volume and density were log-transformed. Sensitivity was improved using repeated CT scans by applying volume correction to individual patient data. Volume correction reduces the variability in progression estimation by a factor of two, and is therefore recommended.

Abstract

Lung densitometry in drug evaluation trials can be confounded by changes in inspiration levels between computed tomography (CT) scans, limiting its sensitivity to detect changes over time. Therefore our aim was to explore whether the sensitivity of lung densitometry could be improved by correcting the measurements for changes in lung volume, based on the estimated relation between density (as measured with the 15th percentile point) and lung volume. We compared four correction methods, using CT data of 143 patients from five European countries. Patients were scanned, generally twice per visit, at baseline and after 2.5 years. The methods included one physiological model and three linear mixed-effects models using a volume-density relation: (1) estimated over the entire population with one scan per visit (model A) and two scans per visit (model B); and (2) estimated for each patient individually (model C). Both log-transformed and original volume and density values were evaluated and the differences in goodness-of-fit between methods were tested. Model C fitted best (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, and P = 0.064), when two scans were available. The most consistent progression estimation was obtained between sites, when both volume and density were log-transformed. Sensitivity was improved using repeated CT scans by applying volume correction to individual patient data. Volume correction reduces the variability in progression estimation by a factor of two, and is therefore recommended.

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:15 December 2008
Deposited On:27 Jan 2009 17:41
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:54
Publisher:American Thoracic Society
ISSN:1546-3222
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1513/pats.200804-040QC
PubMed ID:19056717

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations