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Qualitative aspects of diet affecting visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue: a systematic review of observational and controlled intervention studies


Fischer, Karina; Pick, Julia A; Moewes, Daniela; Nöthlings, Ute (2015). Qualitative aspects of diet affecting visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue: a systematic review of observational and controlled intervention studies. Nutrition Reviews, 73(4):191-215.

Abstract

CONTEXT Knowledge of the role that qualitative as opposed to energy aspects of diet play in the accumulation of visceral abdominal adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAAT) is limited and not conclusive. OBJECTIVE A systematic review was conducted to evaluate and summarize the existing literature investigating the relationships between qualitative aspects of diet, from single dietary components to overall dietary patterns, and VAT and SAAT. DATA SOURCES The PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. STUDY SELECTION Observational and controlled intervention studies that assessed healthy adults or adolescents using magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, or ultrasound were eligible for inclusion. After quality assessment of all eligible studies, 20 observational and 23 controlled intervention studies were included. DATA SYNTHESIS Considering study quality, including nutritional and abdominal adipose tissue assessment, about 30 caloric and noncaloric qualitative aspects of diet were found "to be associated with or affect" VAT and/or SAAT, most notably, medium-chain triacylglycerols, dietary fiber, calcium, phytochemicals, and dietary patterns; for fructose and alcohol, the relationships were less clear. CONCLUSION Additional well-designed prospective studies are warranted to confirm current findings and to identify further qualitative aspects of diet that may influence VAT and SAAT accumulation.

Abstract

CONTEXT Knowledge of the role that qualitative as opposed to energy aspects of diet play in the accumulation of visceral abdominal adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAAT) is limited and not conclusive. OBJECTIVE A systematic review was conducted to evaluate and summarize the existing literature investigating the relationships between qualitative aspects of diet, from single dietary components to overall dietary patterns, and VAT and SAAT. DATA SOURCES The PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. STUDY SELECTION Observational and controlled intervention studies that assessed healthy adults or adolescents using magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, or ultrasound were eligible for inclusion. After quality assessment of all eligible studies, 20 observational and 23 controlled intervention studies were included. DATA SYNTHESIS Considering study quality, including nutritional and abdominal adipose tissue assessment, about 30 caloric and noncaloric qualitative aspects of diet were found "to be associated with or affect" VAT and/or SAAT, most notably, medium-chain triacylglycerols, dietary fiber, calcium, phytochemicals, and dietary patterns; for fructose and alcohol, the relationships were less clear. CONCLUSION Additional well-designed prospective studies are warranted to confirm current findings and to identify further qualitative aspects of diet that may influence VAT and SAAT accumulation.

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6 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Geriatric Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:English
Date:April 2015
Deposited On:12 Jan 2016 08:23
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:45
Publisher:International Life Sciences Institute
ISSN:0029-6643
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuu006
PubMed ID:26024544

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