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Increased 24-hour ad libitum food intake is associated with lower plasma irisin concentrations the following morning in adult humans


Schlögl, Mathias; Piaggi, Paolo; Votruba, Susanne B; Walter, Mary; Krakoff, Jonathan; Thearle, Marie S (2015). Increased 24-hour ad libitum food intake is associated with lower plasma irisin concentrations the following morning in adult humans. Appetite, 90:154-159.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The relationship between food intake and irisin concentrations in humans is unclear. OBJECTIVES To determine whether the previous day's intake impacts fasting plasma irisin concentrations, or whether fasting irisin concentrations associate with subsequent ad libitum food intake. METHODS Sixty-six nondiabetic adults (42 men) were admitted for a study of the determinants of energy intake. After 6 days of a weight maintaining diet, ad libitum energy intake over 3 days was assessed using a vending machine paradigm. Fasting plasma irisin concentrations were measured on the morning of the second day of the vending period. RESULTS There were no correlations between irisin and demographic or anthropometric parameters. On day 1, subjects consumed 144 ± 52% of weight maintaining energy needs. Every additional 500 kcal consumed on day 1 associated with a 3.4% lower irisin concentration the following morning (95% CI -6.2, -0.4%, p = 0.01; adjusted for age, sex and race). If energy intake was expressed as a percentage of weight maintaining energy needs, every 10% increase associated with a 1.9% lower irisin concentration (95% CI -3.7, -0.1%; adjusted p = 0.02). A 100 kcal increase in carbohydrate or fat consumption associated with a 1.3% (95% CI -2.5, -0.1%, p = 0.01) and a 0.6% (95% CI -1.1, -0.0%, p = 0.02) lower irisin concentration, respectively. There was no association between fasting irisin concentrations and subsequent energy intake on day 2 (r = 0.19, p = 0.1). CONCLUSIONS Higher ad libitum 24 h energy intake was associated with lower fasting irisin concentrations the following morning, but fasting irisin concentrations did not predict subsequent energy intake. The decrease in irisin concentrations with increased energy intake is consistent with the detrimental metabolic effects of overeating.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The relationship between food intake and irisin concentrations in humans is unclear. OBJECTIVES To determine whether the previous day's intake impacts fasting plasma irisin concentrations, or whether fasting irisin concentrations associate with subsequent ad libitum food intake. METHODS Sixty-six nondiabetic adults (42 men) were admitted for a study of the determinants of energy intake. After 6 days of a weight maintaining diet, ad libitum energy intake over 3 days was assessed using a vending machine paradigm. Fasting plasma irisin concentrations were measured on the morning of the second day of the vending period. RESULTS There were no correlations between irisin and demographic or anthropometric parameters. On day 1, subjects consumed 144 ± 52% of weight maintaining energy needs. Every additional 500 kcal consumed on day 1 associated with a 3.4% lower irisin concentration the following morning (95% CI -6.2, -0.4%, p = 0.01; adjusted for age, sex and race). If energy intake was expressed as a percentage of weight maintaining energy needs, every 10% increase associated with a 1.9% lower irisin concentration (95% CI -3.7, -0.1%; adjusted p = 0.02). A 100 kcal increase in carbohydrate or fat consumption associated with a 1.3% (95% CI -2.5, -0.1%, p = 0.01) and a 0.6% (95% CI -1.1, -0.0%, p = 0.02) lower irisin concentration, respectively. There was no association between fasting irisin concentrations and subsequent energy intake on day 2 (r = 0.19, p = 0.1). CONCLUSIONS Higher ad libitum 24 h energy intake was associated with lower fasting irisin concentrations the following morning, but fasting irisin concentrations did not predict subsequent energy intake. The decrease in irisin concentrations with increased energy intake is consistent with the detrimental metabolic effects of overeating.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Geriatric Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:English
Date:July 2015
Deposited On:12 Jan 2016 08:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:45
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0195-6663
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2015.03.003
PubMed ID:25765248

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