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Using lung cancer mortality to indirectly approximate smoking patterns in space


Jürgens, Verena; Ess, Silvia; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Cerny, Thomas; Vounatsou, Penelope (2015). Using lung cancer mortality to indirectly approximate smoking patterns in space. Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology, 14-15:23-31.

Abstract

Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer. Non-smoking factors have been associated with the disease. Existing Swiss survey data only capture the country partially and temporal coverage does not allow for a time lag between exposure to tobacco and lung cancer outbreak. Knowledge about the distribution of tobacco-use is essential to estimate its contribution to disease burden. Bayesian regression models were applied to estimate spatial smoking patterns. Data were provided from the Swiss Health Survey (14521 participants). Regression models with spatial random effects (SREs) were employed to obtain smoking proxies based on mortality rates and SREs adjusted for environmental exposures. Population attributable fractions were estimated to assess the burden of tobacco-use on lung cancer mortality. Correlation between observed smoking prevalence with smoking proxies was moderate and stronger in females. In the absence of sufficient survey data, smooth unadjusted mortality rates can be used to assess smoking patterns in Switzerland.

Abstract

Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer. Non-smoking factors have been associated with the disease. Existing Swiss survey data only capture the country partially and temporal coverage does not allow for a time lag between exposure to tobacco and lung cancer outbreak. Knowledge about the distribution of tobacco-use is essential to estimate its contribution to disease burden. Bayesian regression models were applied to estimate spatial smoking patterns. Data were provided from the Swiss Health Survey (14521 participants). Regression models with spatial random effects (SREs) were employed to obtain smoking proxies based on mortality rates and SREs adjusted for environmental exposures. Population attributable fractions were estimated to assess the burden of tobacco-use on lung cancer mortality. Correlation between observed smoking prevalence with smoking proxies was moderate and stronger in females. In the absence of sufficient survey data, smooth unadjusted mortality rates can be used to assess smoking patterns in Switzerland.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2015
Deposited On:23 Dec 2015 11:47
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:46
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1877-5845
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sste.2015.06.003
PubMed ID:26530820

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