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Maxillofacial injuries in severely injured patients


Scheyerer, Max J; Döring, Robert; Fuchs, Nina; Metzler, Philipp; Sprengel, Kai; Werner, Clement M L; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Grätz, Klaus; Wanner, Guido A (2015). Maxillofacial injuries in severely injured patients. Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes, 9(4):Online.

Abstract

BACKGROUND A significant proportion of patients admitted to hospital with multiple traumas exhibit facial injuries. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence and cause of facial injuries in severely injured patients and to examine the role of plastic and maxillofacial surgeons in treatment of this patient collective. METHODS A total of 67 patients, who were assigned to our trauma room with maxillofacial injuries between January 2009 and December 2010, were enrolled in the present study and evaluated. RESULTS The majority of the patients were male (82 %) with a mean age of 44 years. The predominant mechanism of injury was fall from lower levels (<5 m) and occurred in 25 (37 %) cases. The median ISS was 25, with intracranial bleeding found as the most common concomitant injury in 48 cases (72 %). Thirty-one patients (46 %) required interdisciplinary management in the trauma room; maxillofacial surgeons were involved in 27 cases. A total of 35 (52 %) patients were treated surgically, 7 in emergency surgery, thereof. CONCLUSION Maxillofacial injuries are often associated with a risk of other serious concomitant injuries, in particular traumatic brain injuries. Even though emergency operations are only necessary in rare cases, diagnosis and treatment of such concomitant injuries have the potential to be overlooked or delayed in severely injured patients.

Abstract

BACKGROUND A significant proportion of patients admitted to hospital with multiple traumas exhibit facial injuries. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence and cause of facial injuries in severely injured patients and to examine the role of plastic and maxillofacial surgeons in treatment of this patient collective. METHODS A total of 67 patients, who were assigned to our trauma room with maxillofacial injuries between January 2009 and December 2010, were enrolled in the present study and evaluated. RESULTS The majority of the patients were male (82 %) with a mean age of 44 years. The predominant mechanism of injury was fall from lower levels (<5 m) and occurred in 25 (37 %) cases. The median ISS was 25, with intracranial bleeding found as the most common concomitant injury in 48 cases (72 %). Thirty-one patients (46 %) required interdisciplinary management in the trauma room; maxillofacial surgeons were involved in 27 cases. A total of 35 (52 %) patients were treated surgically, 7 in emergency surgery, thereof. CONCLUSION Maxillofacial injuries are often associated with a risk of other serious concomitant injuries, in particular traumatic brain injuries. Even though emergency operations are only necessary in rare cases, diagnosis and treatment of such concomitant injuries have the potential to be overlooked or delayed in severely injured patients.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Trauma Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:05 Jan 2016 14:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:48
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1752-2897
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s13032-015-0025-2
PubMed ID:26085840

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