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Glenohumeral joint reaction forces increase with critical shoulder angles representative of osteoarthritis - a biomechanical analysis


Viehöfer, Arnd F; Snedeker, Jess G; Baumgartner, Daniel; Gerber, Christian (2016). Glenohumeral joint reaction forces increase with critical shoulder angles representative of osteoarthritis - a biomechanical analysis. Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 34(6):1047-1052.

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) of the glenohumeral joint constitutes the most frequent indication for nontraumatic shoulder joint replacement. Recently a small critical shoulder angle (CSA) was found to be associated with a high prevalence of OA. This study aims to verify the hypothesis that a small CSA leads to higher glenohumeral joint reaction forces during activities of daily living than a normal CSA. A shoulder simulator with simulated deltoid (DLT), supraspinatus (SSP), infraspinatus/ teres minor (ISP/TM), and subscapularis (SSC) musculotendinous units was constructed. The DLT wrapping on the humerus was simulated using a pulley that could be horizontally adjusted to simulate the 28°CSA found in OA or the 33°CSA found in disease free shoulders. Over a range of motion between 6° and 82° of thoracohumeral abduction joint forces were measured using a 6-axis load cell. An OA associated CSA yielded higher net joint reaction forces than a normal CSA over the entire range of motion. The maximum difference of 26.4 N (8.5%) was found at 55° of thoracohumeral abduction. Our model thus suggests that a CSA typical for OA predisposes the glenohumeral joint to higher joint reaction forces and could plausibly play a role in joint overloading and development of OA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) of the glenohumeral joint constitutes the most frequent indication for nontraumatic shoulder joint replacement. Recently a small critical shoulder angle (CSA) was found to be associated with a high prevalence of OA. This study aims to verify the hypothesis that a small CSA leads to higher glenohumeral joint reaction forces during activities of daily living than a normal CSA. A shoulder simulator with simulated deltoid (DLT), supraspinatus (SSP), infraspinatus/ teres minor (ISP/TM), and subscapularis (SSC) musculotendinous units was constructed. The DLT wrapping on the humerus was simulated using a pulley that could be horizontally adjusted to simulate the 28°CSA found in OA or the 33°CSA found in disease free shoulders. Over a range of motion between 6° and 82° of thoracohumeral abduction joint forces were measured using a 6-axis load cell. An OA associated CSA yielded higher net joint reaction forces than a normal CSA over the entire range of motion. The maximum difference of 26.4 N (8.5%) was found at 55° of thoracohumeral abduction. Our model thus suggests that a CSA typical for OA predisposes the glenohumeral joint to higher joint reaction forces and could plausibly play a role in joint overloading and development of OA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:06 Jan 2016 10:39
Last Modified:27 May 2016 01:01
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0736-0266
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/jor.23122
PubMed ID:26638117

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