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Severe hypoxia and multiple infarctions resembling Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease


Mittelbronn, M; Capper, D; Bader, B; Schittenhelm, J; Haybaeck, J; Weber, P; Meyermann, R; Kretzschmar, H A; Wietholter, H (2008). Severe hypoxia and multiple infarctions resembling Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Folia Neuropathologica, 46(2):149-153.

Abstract

Although neuropathological examination is still required for the definite diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), specialised clinical assessment predicts probable CJD. Here we present a 73-year-old female patient presenting with rapid cognitive decline, visual, acoustic and cerebellar disturbances, ataxia and EEG changes compatible with early CJD stages. MRI revealed hyperintensities within the thalami, hypothalami, corpora mammillaria, the tectum and the cortex. Initial neuropathological examination showed severe cortical and subcortical spongiosis. However, both immunohistochemistry and Western blotting showed no pathological prion protein. Finally, small infarctions affecting the tectum, tegmentum, corpora mammillaria and global hypoxic-ischaemic changes could be identified as the probable reason for the changes interpreted as CJD-related pathology. Hypoxic-ischaemic CNS alterations mainly affecting the supply area of the basilar artery should be ruled out in case of probable CJD. In addition, severe spongiosis can be misleading in the histological examination, suggesting the diagnosis of a prion-induced spongiform encephalopathy.

Although neuropathological examination is still required for the definite diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), specialised clinical assessment predicts probable CJD. Here we present a 73-year-old female patient presenting with rapid cognitive decline, visual, acoustic and cerebellar disturbances, ataxia and EEG changes compatible with early CJD stages. MRI revealed hyperintensities within the thalami, hypothalami, corpora mammillaria, the tectum and the cortex. Initial neuropathological examination showed severe cortical and subcortical spongiosis. However, both immunohistochemistry and Western blotting showed no pathological prion protein. Finally, small infarctions affecting the tectum, tegmentum, corpora mammillaria and global hypoxic-ischaemic changes could be identified as the probable reason for the changes interpreted as CJD-related pathology. Hypoxic-ischaemic CNS alterations mainly affecting the supply area of the basilar artery should be ruled out in case of probable CJD. In addition, severe spongiosis can be misleading in the histological examination, suggesting the diagnosis of a prion-induced spongiform encephalopathy.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:28 Jan 2009 10:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:54
Publisher:Termedia
ISSN:1509-572X
Official URL:http://www.termedia.pl/magazine.php?magazine_id=20&article_id=10630&magazine_subpage=ABSTRACT
PubMed ID:18587709

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