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Early patient satisfaction with different treatment pathways for trigger finger and thumb


Becker, Stéphanie J E; Braun, Yvonne; Janssen, Stein J; Neuhaus, Valentin; Ring, David; Mudgal, Chaitanya S (2015). Early patient satisfaction with different treatment pathways for trigger finger and thumb. Journal of Hand and Microsurgery, 7(2):283-293.

Abstract

Little is known about factors related to patient satisfaction with treatment for trigger digits. This study tested the null hypothesis that there are no factors associated with treatment satisfaction 2 months after completion of treatment (absence of triggering) or 4 months after the last visit for patients with a trigger thumb or finger. Secondary null hypotheses were: 1) There are no factors associated with a change in patients' preferred treatment before and after consultation with a hand surgeon; and 2) Initial treatment provided is not different from final received treatment. In an observational study, 63 English-speaking adult patients were enrolled after being diagnosed with one or more new idiopathic trigger digits by one of two hand surgeons, but before the hand surgeon discussed treatment options. Patients were asked to fill out questionnaires at enrollment. Final evaluation was by phone. Satisfaction with treatment was not related to the initial treatment or other patient or disease factors. Twenty-three patients (37 %) had a different preference for treatment after talking with a hand surgeon. Involvement of the long and ring fingers were the only factors associated with staying with pre-visit treatment preferences. There was a significant difference in proportions of the various treatments provided at enrollment and final treatment recorded at the final phone evaluation, 14 patients (22 %) had a subsequent alternative form of treatment. Patients' preferences for trigger finger treatment often change after consulting with a hand surgeon and during treatment, but these choices do not affect treatment satisfaction.

Little is known about factors related to patient satisfaction with treatment for trigger digits. This study tested the null hypothesis that there are no factors associated with treatment satisfaction 2 months after completion of treatment (absence of triggering) or 4 months after the last visit for patients with a trigger thumb or finger. Secondary null hypotheses were: 1) There are no factors associated with a change in patients' preferred treatment before and after consultation with a hand surgeon; and 2) Initial treatment provided is not different from final received treatment. In an observational study, 63 English-speaking adult patients were enrolled after being diagnosed with one or more new idiopathic trigger digits by one of two hand surgeons, but before the hand surgeon discussed treatment options. Patients were asked to fill out questionnaires at enrollment. Final evaluation was by phone. Satisfaction with treatment was not related to the initial treatment or other patient or disease factors. Twenty-three patients (37 %) had a different preference for treatment after talking with a hand surgeon. Involvement of the long and ring fingers were the only factors associated with staying with pre-visit treatment preferences. There was a significant difference in proportions of the various treatments provided at enrollment and final treatment recorded at the final phone evaluation, 14 patients (22 %) had a subsequent alternative form of treatment. Patients' preferences for trigger finger treatment often change after consulting with a hand surgeon and during treatment, but these choices do not affect treatment satisfaction.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Trauma Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:December 2015
Deposited On:06 Jan 2016 15:52
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:50
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0974-3227
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s12593-015-0203-5
PubMed ID:26578831

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