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HDL and atherothrombotic vascular disease


Annema, Wijtske; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Kovanen, Petri T (2015). HDL and atherothrombotic vascular disease. In: von Eckardstein, Arnold; Kardassis, Dimistris. High Density Lipoproteins : From Biological Understanding to Clinical Exploitation. Berlin Heidelberg New York: Springer, 369-403.

Abstract

High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) exert many beneficial effects which may help to protect against the development or progression of atherosclerosis or even facilitate lesion regression. These activities include promoting cellular cholesterol efflux, protecting low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) from modification, preserving endothelial function, as well as anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic effects. However, questions remain about the relative importance of these activities for atheroprotection. Furthermore, the many molecules (both lipids and proteins) associated with HDLs exert both distinct and overlapping activities, which may be compromised by inflammatory conditions, resulting in either loss of function or even gain of dysfunction. This complexity of HDL functionality has so far precluded elucidation of distinct structure-function relationships for HDL or its components. A better understanding of HDL metabolism and structure-function relationships is therefore crucial to exploit HDLs and its associated components and cellular pathways as potential targets for anti-atherosclerotic therapies and diagnostic markers.

Abstract

High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) exert many beneficial effects which may help to protect against the development or progression of atherosclerosis or even facilitate lesion regression. These activities include promoting cellular cholesterol efflux, protecting low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) from modification, preserving endothelial function, as well as anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic effects. However, questions remain about the relative importance of these activities for atheroprotection. Furthermore, the many molecules (both lipids and proteins) associated with HDLs exert both distinct and overlapping activities, which may be compromised by inflammatory conditions, resulting in either loss of function or even gain of dysfunction. This complexity of HDL functionality has so far precluded elucidation of distinct structure-function relationships for HDL or its components. A better understanding of HDL metabolism and structure-function relationships is therefore crucial to exploit HDLs and its associated components and cellular pathways as potential targets for anti-atherosclerotic therapies and diagnostic markers.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:18 Jan 2016 15:36
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:52
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology
Number:224
ISSN:0171-2004
ISBN:978-3-319-09664-3
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-09665-0_11
PubMed ID:25522995

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