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Preventing transfer of infectious agents


Denner, Joachim; Mueller, Nicolas J (2015). Preventing transfer of infectious agents. International Journal of Surgery, 23(Pt B):306-311.

Abstract

Xenotransplantation using pig cells, tissues and organs may be associated with the transfer of porcine infectious agents, which may infect the human recipient and in the worst case induce a disease (zoonosis). To prevent this, a broad screening program of the donor animals for putative zoonotic microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and others, using sensitive and specific detection methods has to be performed. As long as it is still unknown, which microorganism represents a real risk for the recipient, experience from allotransplantation should be brought in. Due to the fact that pigs can be screened long before the date of transplantation, xenotransplantation will become eventually safer compared with allotransplantation. Screening and selection of animals free of potential zoonotic microorganisms, Caesarean section, vaccination and/or treatment with chemotherapeutics are the strategies of choice to obtain donor animals not transmitting microorganisms. In the case of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) which are integrated in the genome of all pigs and which cannot be eliminated this way, selection of animals with low virus expression and generation of genetically modified pigs suppressing PERV expressions may be performed.

Abstract

Xenotransplantation using pig cells, tissues and organs may be associated with the transfer of porcine infectious agents, which may infect the human recipient and in the worst case induce a disease (zoonosis). To prevent this, a broad screening program of the donor animals for putative zoonotic microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and others, using sensitive and specific detection methods has to be performed. As long as it is still unknown, which microorganism represents a real risk for the recipient, experience from allotransplantation should be brought in. Due to the fact that pigs can be screened long before the date of transplantation, xenotransplantation will become eventually safer compared with allotransplantation. Screening and selection of animals free of potential zoonotic microorganisms, Caesarean section, vaccination and/or treatment with chemotherapeutics are the strategies of choice to obtain donor animals not transmitting microorganisms. In the case of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) which are integrated in the genome of all pigs and which cannot be eliminated this way, selection of animals with low virus expression and generation of genetically modified pigs suppressing PERV expressions may be performed.

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2015
Deposited On:25 Jan 2016 16:07
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:54
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1743-9159
Additional Information:Special Issue: Xenotransplantation
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsu.2015.08.032
PubMed ID:26316157

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