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Nondermatomal somatosensory deficits in chronic pain are associated with cerebral grey matter changes


Riederer, Franz; Landmann, Gunther; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Stockinger, Lenka; Egloff, Niklaus; Sprott, Haiko; Schleinzer, Wolfgang; Pirrotta, Roberto; Dumat, Wolfgang; Luechinger, Roger; Baumgartner, Christoph; Kollias, Spyridon; Sándor, Peter S (2015). Nondermatomal somatosensory deficits in chronic pain are associated with cerebral grey matter changes. World Journal of Biological Psychiatry:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Widespread sensory deficits occur in 20-40% of chronic pain patients on the side of pain, independent of pain aetiology, and are known as nondermatomal sensory deficits (NDSDs). NDSDs can occur in absence of central or peripheral nervous system lesions. We hypothesised that NDSDs were associated with cerebral grey matter changes in the sensory system and in pain processing regions, detectable with voxel-based morphometry.
METHODS: Twenty-five patients with NDSDs, 23 patients without NDSDs ("pain-only"), and 29 healthy controls were studied with high resolution structural MRI of the brain. A comprehensive clinical and psychiatric evaluation based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual was performed in all patients.
RESULTS: Patients with NDSDs and "pain-only" did not differ concerning demographic data and psychiatric diagnoses, although anxiety scores (HADS-A) were higher in patients with NDSDs. In patients with NDSDs, grey matter increases were found in the right primary sensory cortex, thalamus, and bilaterally in lateral temporal regions and the hippocampus/fusiform gyrus. "Pain-only" patients showed a bilateral grey matter increase in the posterior insula and less pronounced changes in sensorimotor cortex.
CONCLUSIONS: Dysfunctional sensory processing in patients with NDSDs is associated with complex changes in grey matter volume, involving the somatosensory system and temporal regions.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Widespread sensory deficits occur in 20-40% of chronic pain patients on the side of pain, independent of pain aetiology, and are known as nondermatomal sensory deficits (NDSDs). NDSDs can occur in absence of central or peripheral nervous system lesions. We hypothesised that NDSDs were associated with cerebral grey matter changes in the sensory system and in pain processing regions, detectable with voxel-based morphometry.
METHODS: Twenty-five patients with NDSDs, 23 patients without NDSDs ("pain-only"), and 29 healthy controls were studied with high resolution structural MRI of the brain. A comprehensive clinical and psychiatric evaluation based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual was performed in all patients.
RESULTS: Patients with NDSDs and "pain-only" did not differ concerning demographic data and psychiatric diagnoses, although anxiety scores (HADS-A) were higher in patients with NDSDs. In patients with NDSDs, grey matter increases were found in the right primary sensory cortex, thalamus, and bilaterally in lateral temporal regions and the hippocampus/fusiform gyrus. "Pain-only" patients showed a bilateral grey matter increase in the posterior insula and less pronounced changes in sensorimotor cortex.
CONCLUSIONS: Dysfunctional sensory processing in patients with NDSDs is associated with complex changes in grey matter volume, involving the somatosensory system and temporal regions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neuroradiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:22 October 2015
Deposited On:18 Jan 2016 16:03
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:55
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:1562-2975
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3109/15622975.2015.1073356
PubMed ID:26492569

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