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Bone marrow immunophenotyping by flow cytometry in refractory cytopenia of childhood


Abstract

Refractory cytopenia of childhood is the most common type of childhood myelodysplastic syndrome. Because the majority of children with refractory cytopenia have a normal karyotype and a hypocellular bone marrow, differentiating refractory cytopenia from the immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome (very) severe aplastic anemia can be challenging. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping of bone marrow has been shown to be a valuable diagnostic tool in differentiating myelodysplastic syndrome from non-clonal cytopenias in adults. Here, we performed the first comprehensive flow cytometric analysis of immature myeloid, lymphoid cells and erythroid cells, and granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphoid cells in bone marrow obtained from a large prospective cohort of 81 children with refractory cytopenia. Children with refractory cyotopenia had a strongly reduced myeloid compartment, but not as severe as children with aplastic anemia. Furthermore, the number of flow cytometric abnormalities was significantly higher in children with refractory cytopenia than in healthy controls and in children with aplastic anemia, but lower than in advanced myelodysplastic syndrome. We conclude that flow cytometric immunophenotyping could be a relevant addition to histopathology in the diagnosis of refractory cytopenia of childhood. (The multi-center studies EWOG-MDS RC06 and EWOG-MDS 2006 are registered at clinicaltrials.gov identifiers 00499070 and 00662090, respectively).

Abstract

Refractory cytopenia of childhood is the most common type of childhood myelodysplastic syndrome. Because the majority of children with refractory cytopenia have a normal karyotype and a hypocellular bone marrow, differentiating refractory cytopenia from the immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome (very) severe aplastic anemia can be challenging. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping of bone marrow has been shown to be a valuable diagnostic tool in differentiating myelodysplastic syndrome from non-clonal cytopenias in adults. Here, we performed the first comprehensive flow cytometric analysis of immature myeloid, lymphoid cells and erythroid cells, and granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphoid cells in bone marrow obtained from a large prospective cohort of 81 children with refractory cytopenia. Children with refractory cyotopenia had a strongly reduced myeloid compartment, but not as severe as children with aplastic anemia. Furthermore, the number of flow cytometric abnormalities was significantly higher in children with refractory cytopenia than in healthy controls and in children with aplastic anemia, but lower than in advanced myelodysplastic syndrome. We conclude that flow cytometric immunophenotyping could be a relevant addition to histopathology in the diagnosis of refractory cytopenia of childhood. (The multi-center studies EWOG-MDS RC06 and EWOG-MDS 2006 are registered at clinicaltrials.gov identifiers 00499070 and 00662090, respectively).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2015
Deposited On:29 Jan 2016 11:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:55
Publisher:Ferrata Storti Foundation
ISSN:0390-6078
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.haematologica.org
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2014.107706
PubMed ID:25425683

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