UZH-Logo

Amygdala and hippocampal volumes and cognition in adult survivors of childhood abuse with dissociative disorders


Weniger, G; Lange, C; Sachsse, U; Irle, E (2008). Amygdala and hippocampal volumes and cognition in adult survivors of childhood abuse with dissociative disorders. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 118(4):281-290.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Trauma-exposed individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) display reduced amygdala and hippocampal size and impaired cognition. However, studies on trauma-exposed individuals with dissociative amnesia (DA) or dissociative identity disorder (DID) are lacking. METHOD: Twenty-three young women who had experienced severe childhood sexual/physical abuse, diagnosed with DA/DID or PTSD, and 25 healthy control subjects were subjected to 3D structural magnetic resonance imaging of amygdala and hippocampus and a clinical and neuropsychological investigation. RESULTS: Compared with controls, trauma-exposed subjects with PTSD (n = 10) displayed significantly reduced amygdala and hippocampal size and significantly impaired cognition. By contrast, trauma-exposed subjects with DA or DID (n = 13) displayed normal amygdala and hippocampal size and normal cognition. CONCLUSION: We report for the first time volumetric results in subjects with DA/DID without PTSD as comorbid diagnosis. Our results indicate preserved amygdala and hippocampal size and preserved cognition in subjects with these disorders.

OBJECTIVE: Trauma-exposed individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) display reduced amygdala and hippocampal size and impaired cognition. However, studies on trauma-exposed individuals with dissociative amnesia (DA) or dissociative identity disorder (DID) are lacking. METHOD: Twenty-three young women who had experienced severe childhood sexual/physical abuse, diagnosed with DA/DID or PTSD, and 25 healthy control subjects were subjected to 3D structural magnetic resonance imaging of amygdala and hippocampus and a clinical and neuropsychological investigation. RESULTS: Compared with controls, trauma-exposed subjects with PTSD (n = 10) displayed significantly reduced amygdala and hippocampal size and significantly impaired cognition. By contrast, trauma-exposed subjects with DA or DID (n = 13) displayed normal amygdala and hippocampal size and normal cognition. CONCLUSION: We report for the first time volumetric results in subjects with DA/DID without PTSD as comorbid diagnosis. Our results indicate preserved amygdala and hippocampal size and preserved cognition in subjects with these disorders.

Citations

50 citations in Web of Science®
58 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 29 Jan 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical and Social Psychiatry Zurich West (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:29 Jan 2009 10:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:55
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0001-690X
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1600-0447.2008.01246.x
PubMed ID:18759808
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-11953

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations