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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-11992

Strobel, K; Exner, U E; Stumpe, K D M; Hany, T F; Bode, B; Mende, K; Veit-Haibach, P; von Schulthess, G K; Hodler, J (2008). The additional value of CT images interpretation in the differential diagnosis of benign vs. malignant primary bone lesions with 18F-FDG-PET/CT. European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, 35(11):2000-2008.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the value of a dedicated interpretation of the CT images in the differential diagnosis of benign vs. malignant primary bone lesions with 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 50 consecutive patients (21 women, 29 men, mean age 36.9, age range 11-72) with suspected primary bone neoplasm conventional radiographs and 18F-FDG-PET/CT were performed. Differentiation of benign and malignant lesions was separately performed on conventional radiographs, PET alone (PET), and PET/CT with specific evaluation of the CT part. Histology served as the standard of reference in 46 cases, clinical, and imaging follow-up in four cases. RESULTS: According to the standard of reference, conventional 17 lesions were benign and 33 malignant. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in assessment of malignancy was 85%, 65% and 78% for conventional radiographs, 85%, 35% and 68% for PET alone and 91%, 77% and 86% for combined PET/CT. Median SUV(max) was 3.5 for benign lesions (range 1.6-8.0) and 5.7 (range 0.8-41.7) for malignant lesions. In eight patients with bone lesions with high FDG-uptake (SUV(max) >or= 2.5) dedicated CT interpretation led to the correct diagnosis of a benign lesion (three fibrous dysplasias, two osteomyelitis, one aneurysmatic bone cyst, one fibrous cortical defect, 1 phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor). In four patients with lesions with low FDG-uptake (SUV(max) < 2.5) dedicated CT interpretation led to the correct diagnosis of a malignant lesion (three chondrosarcomas and one leiomyosarcoma). Combined PET/CT was significantly more accurate in the differentiation of benign and malignant lesions than PET alone (p = .039). There was no significant difference between PET/CT and conventional radiographs (p = .625). CONCLUSION: Dedicated interpretation of the CT part significantly improved the performance of FDG-PET/CT in differentiation of benign and malignant primary bone lesions compared to PET alone. PET/CT more commonly differentiated benign from malignant primary bone lesions compared with conventional radiographs, but this difference was not significant.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Surgical Pathology
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:29 Jan 2009 11:11
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 22:15
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1619-7070
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com.
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00259-008-0876-0
PubMed ID:18712385
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 17
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Scopus®. Citation Count: 22

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