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Novel splittable N-Tx/2N-Rx transceiver phased array to optimize both signal-to-noise ratio and transmit efficiency at 9.4T


Avdievich, Nikolai I; Giapitzakis, Ioannis A; Henning, Anke (2016). Novel splittable N-Tx/2N-Rx transceiver phased array to optimize both signal-to-noise ratio and transmit efficiency at 9.4T. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 76(5):1621-1628.

Abstract

PURPOSE: The goal of this study was to optimize signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and parallel receive (Rx) performance of ultrahigh field (UHF) (≥7T) transceiver arrays without compromising their transmit (Tx) efficiency. UHF transceiver head phased arrays with a tight fit improve Tx efficiency in comparison with Tx-only arrays, which are usually larger so that Rx-only arrays can fit inside. However, having ≥16 elements inside a head transceiver array presents decoupling problems. Furthermore, the available number of Tx channels is limited.
METHODS: A prototype of a splittable transceiver phased array was constructed. The array consisted of four flat surface Tx loops positioned in two rows. Each loop could be split into two smaller overlapped Rx loops during reception.
RESULTS: Experimental data demonstrated that both SNR and parallel reception performance improved substantially by doubling the number of Rx elements from four to eight.
CONCLUSION: As a proof of concept, we developed and constructed a novel splittable transceiver phased array that allows doubling of the number of Rx elements while keeping both Tx and Rx elements at the same distance from the subject. Both Tx and Rx performance can be optimized at the same time using this method. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Abstract

PURPOSE: The goal of this study was to optimize signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and parallel receive (Rx) performance of ultrahigh field (UHF) (≥7T) transceiver arrays without compromising their transmit (Tx) efficiency. UHF transceiver head phased arrays with a tight fit improve Tx efficiency in comparison with Tx-only arrays, which are usually larger so that Rx-only arrays can fit inside. However, having ≥16 elements inside a head transceiver array presents decoupling problems. Furthermore, the available number of Tx channels is limited.
METHODS: A prototype of a splittable transceiver phased array was constructed. The array consisted of four flat surface Tx loops positioned in two rows. Each loop could be split into two smaller overlapped Rx loops during reception.
RESULTS: Experimental data demonstrated that both SNR and parallel reception performance improved substantially by doubling the number of Rx elements from four to eight.
CONCLUSION: As a proof of concept, we developed and constructed a novel splittable transceiver phased array that allows doubling of the number of Rx elements while keeping both Tx and Rx elements at the same distance from the subject. Both Tx and Rx performance can be optimized at the same time using this method. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:03 Feb 2016 15:07
Last Modified:18 Oct 2016 01:00
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0740-3194
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.26051
PubMed ID:26612491

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