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Transfemoral implantation of a fully repositionable and retrievable transcatheter valve for noncalcified pure aortic regurgitation


Schofer, Joachim; Nietlispach, Fabian; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Colombo, Antonio; Gatto, Fernando; De Marco, Federico; Mangieri, Antonio; Hansen, Lorenz; Bruschi, Giuseppe; Ruparelia, Neil; Rieß, Friedrich-Christian; Maisano, Franscesco; Latib, Azeem (2015). Transfemoral implantation of a fully repositionable and retrievable transcatheter valve for noncalcified pure aortic regurgitation. JACC. Cardiovascular interventions, 8(14):1842-1849.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the use of the Direct Flow Medical (DFM) transcatheter heart valve (Direct Flow Medical, Santa Rosa, California) for the treatment of noncalcific pure aortic regurgitation (AR).
BACKGROUND: The treatment of noncalcific AR has remained a relative contraindication with transcatheter heart valves due to challenges in anchoring devices in the absence of calcium, concerns of valve embolization, and the high risk of significant residual paravalvular leak.
METHODS: The study population consisted of patients treated for severe noncalcific pure AR with transfemoral implantation of a DFM transcatheter heart valve at 6 European centers. The primary endpoint was the composite endpoint of device success and the secondary endpoint was the composite early safety endpoint (according to the VARC-2 criteria).
RESULTS: Eleven high-risk (STS score 8.84 ± 8.9, Logistic EuroSCORE 19.9 ± 7.1) patients (mean age 74.7 ± 12.9 years) were included. Device success was achieved in all patients. In 1 patient, the initial valve prosthesis was retrieved after pull-through, and a second valve was successfully deployed. The early safety endpoint was reached in 91% of the patients, with 1 patient requiring surgical aortic valve replacement secondary to downward dislocation of the prosthesis that was successfully managed with surgical aortic valve replacement. DFM implantation resulted in excellent hemodynamics with none or trivial paravalvular regurgitation in 9 patients and a transprosthetic gradient of 7.7 ± 5.1 mm Hg at 30-day follow up. All patients derived symptomatic benefit following the procedure, with 72% in New York Heart Association functional class I or II.
CONCLUSIONS: This study reports the feasibility of treating severe noncalcific AR with the Direct Flow prosthesis via the transfemoral route.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the use of the Direct Flow Medical (DFM) transcatheter heart valve (Direct Flow Medical, Santa Rosa, California) for the treatment of noncalcific pure aortic regurgitation (AR).
BACKGROUND: The treatment of noncalcific AR has remained a relative contraindication with transcatheter heart valves due to challenges in anchoring devices in the absence of calcium, concerns of valve embolization, and the high risk of significant residual paravalvular leak.
METHODS: The study population consisted of patients treated for severe noncalcific pure AR with transfemoral implantation of a DFM transcatheter heart valve at 6 European centers. The primary endpoint was the composite endpoint of device success and the secondary endpoint was the composite early safety endpoint (according to the VARC-2 criteria).
RESULTS: Eleven high-risk (STS score 8.84 ± 8.9, Logistic EuroSCORE 19.9 ± 7.1) patients (mean age 74.7 ± 12.9 years) were included. Device success was achieved in all patients. In 1 patient, the initial valve prosthesis was retrieved after pull-through, and a second valve was successfully deployed. The early safety endpoint was reached in 91% of the patients, with 1 patient requiring surgical aortic valve replacement secondary to downward dislocation of the prosthesis that was successfully managed with surgical aortic valve replacement. DFM implantation resulted in excellent hemodynamics with none or trivial paravalvular regurgitation in 9 patients and a transprosthetic gradient of 7.7 ± 5.1 mm Hg at 30-day follow up. All patients derived symptomatic benefit following the procedure, with 72% in New York Heart Association functional class I or II.
CONCLUSIONS: This study reports the feasibility of treating severe noncalcific AR with the Direct Flow prosthesis via the transfemoral route.

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2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:21 December 2015
Deposited On:02 Feb 2016 13:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:58
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1876-7605
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcin.2015.08.022
PubMed ID:26604062

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