UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

T Cell Engineering


Pircher, Magdalena; Schirrmann, Thomas; Petrausch, Ulf (2015). T Cell Engineering. In: Michielin, O; Coukos, G. Immuno-Oncology. Basel: Karger, 110-135.

Abstract

T cells are a new and promising antigen-specific therapeutic option for the treatment of malignant diseases. To achieve antigen specificity against tumor antigens, T cells can be manipulated by gene transfer to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). CAR-expressing T cells are called redirected T cells. CARs are composed of an extracellular antibody-derived antigen recognition domain, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmatic signal domain. Therefore, redirected T cells combine the exchangeable specificity of an antibody with the cytotoxic machinery of a T cell. Early clinical trials with redirected T cells targeting cluster of differentiation (CD) 19 have shown impressive results in CD19-positive hematological cancers. However, for solid cancers only limited clinical experience exists and new and innovative concepts have to be developed to overcome tumor-mediated immune suppression. Herein, we describe the general design of a CAR, the function of the different domains and the different strategies to produce redirected T cells. Furthermore, we summarize and discuss the preclinical and clinical data indicating the tremendous potential of redirected T cells to become a mainstay of cancer immunotherapy.

Abstract

T cells are a new and promising antigen-specific therapeutic option for the treatment of malignant diseases. To achieve antigen specificity against tumor antigens, T cells can be manipulated by gene transfer to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). CAR-expressing T cells are called redirected T cells. CARs are composed of an extracellular antibody-derived antigen recognition domain, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmatic signal domain. Therefore, redirected T cells combine the exchangeable specificity of an antibody with the cytotoxic machinery of a T cell. Early clinical trials with redirected T cells targeting cluster of differentiation (CD) 19 have shown impressive results in CD19-positive hematological cancers. However, for solid cancers only limited clinical experience exists and new and innovative concepts have to be developed to overcome tumor-mediated immune suppression. Herein, we describe the general design of a CAR, the function of the different domains and the different strategies to produce redirected T cells. Furthermore, we summarize and discuss the preclinical and clinical data indicating the tremendous potential of redirected T cells to become a mainstay of cancer immunotherapy.

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Oncology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:04 Feb 2016 09:36
Last Modified:19 Jun 2016 11:08
Publisher:Karger
Number:42
ISBN:978-3-318-05589-4
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000437180
Related URLs:http://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/437180 (Publisher)
PubMed ID:26383243

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations