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A matching pursuit algorithm for inferring tonic sympathetic arousal from spontaneous skin conductance fluctuations


Bach, Dominik R; Staib, Matthias (2015). A matching pursuit algorithm for inferring tonic sympathetic arousal from spontaneous skin conductance fluctuations. Psychophysiology, 52(8):1106-1112.

Abstract

Tonic sympathetic arousal is often inferred from spontaneous fluctuations in skin conductance, and this relies on assumptions about the shape of these fluctuations and how they are generated. We have previously furnished a psychophysiological model for this relation, and an efficient and reliable inversion method to estimate tonic arousal from given data in the framework of dynamic causal modeling (DCM). Here, we provide a fast alternative inversion method in the form of a matching pursuit (MP) algorithm. Analyzing simulated data, this algorithm approximates the true underlying arousal up to about 10 spontaneous fluctuations per minute of data. For empirical data, we assess predictive validity as the ability to differentiate two known psychological arousal states. Predictive validity is comparable between the methods for three datasets, and also comparable to visual peak scoring. Computation time of the MP algorithm is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster for the MP than the DCM algorithm. In summary, the new MP algorithm provides a fast and reliable alternative to DCM inversion for SF data, in particular when the expected number of fluctuations is lower than 10 per minute, as in typical experimental situations.

Abstract

Tonic sympathetic arousal is often inferred from spontaneous fluctuations in skin conductance, and this relies on assumptions about the shape of these fluctuations and how they are generated. We have previously furnished a psychophysiological model for this relation, and an efficient and reliable inversion method to estimate tonic arousal from given data in the framework of dynamic causal modeling (DCM). Here, we provide a fast alternative inversion method in the form of a matching pursuit (MP) algorithm. Analyzing simulated data, this algorithm approximates the true underlying arousal up to about 10 spontaneous fluctuations per minute of data. For empirical data, we assess predictive validity as the ability to differentiate two known psychological arousal states. Predictive validity is comparable between the methods for three datasets, and also comparable to visual peak scoring. Computation time of the MP algorithm is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster for the MP than the DCM algorithm. In summary, the new MP algorithm provides a fast and reliable alternative to DCM inversion for SF data, in particular when the expected number of fluctuations is lower than 10 per minute, as in typical experimental situations.

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1 citation in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2015
Deposited On:04 Feb 2016 10:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:58
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0048-5772
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.12434
PubMed ID:25930177

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