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Developmental Neuroimmune Mechanisms in Schizophrenia


Stadlbauer, Ulrike; Meyer, Urs (2015). Developmental Neuroimmune Mechanisms in Schizophrenia. In: Lipina, Tatiana; Roder, John. Drug Discovery for Schizophrenia. Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry, 46-69.

Abstract

The exploration of possible immune mechanisms in schizophrenia is a long-standing area of research that continues to attract attention from basic researchers and clinicians alike. Within this neuroimmune framework, a great deal of interest has been centered upon the possible contribution of infections in prenatal life. The antenatal period is highly sensitive to damaging effects induced by environmental insults such as infections, and therefore considerable efforts have been made to delineate the role of prenatal infection and downstream neuroimmune mechanisms in the development of schizophrenia and related disorders. This chapter integrates the findings from human epidemiological studies and translational animal models that support a crucial role of the immune system in brain development and discusses their relevance to etiopathological models of schizophrenia. It further highlights that developmental neuroimmune mechanisms may represent valuable targets to attenuate or even prevent the emergence of brain and behavioral pathology associated with schizophrenic disease.

Abstract

The exploration of possible immune mechanisms in schizophrenia is a long-standing area of research that continues to attract attention from basic researchers and clinicians alike. Within this neuroimmune framework, a great deal of interest has been centered upon the possible contribution of infections in prenatal life. The antenatal period is highly sensitive to damaging effects induced by environmental insults such as infections, and therefore considerable efforts have been made to delineate the role of prenatal infection and downstream neuroimmune mechanisms in the development of schizophrenia and related disorders. This chapter integrates the findings from human epidemiological studies and translational animal models that support a crucial role of the immune system in brain development and discusses their relevance to etiopathological models of schizophrenia. It further highlights that developmental neuroimmune mechanisms may represent valuable targets to attenuate or even prevent the emergence of brain and behavioral pathology associated with schizophrenic disease.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:03 Feb 2016 11:37
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:59
Publisher:Royal Society of Chemistry
Series Name:RSC Drug Discovery Series
Number:44
ISSN:2041-3203
ISBN:978-1-78262-026-6
Additional Information:CHAPTER 3
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1039/9781782622499-00046
Related URLs:http://doi.org/10.1039/9781782622499 (Publisher)

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