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Chemokines in neuroectodermal development and their potential implication in cancer stem cell-driven metastasis


Civenni, G; Sommer, L (2009). Chemokines in neuroectodermal development and their potential implication in cancer stem cell-driven metastasis. Seminars in Cancer Biology, 19(2):68-75.

Abstract

Chemokines regulate proliferation and migration of various types of normal stem and progenitor cells, including precursor cells of neuroectodermal origin. Based on this it is conceivable that the established role of chemokines in cancer cell proliferation and organ-specific metastasis might also be associated with stem cell-like cells present in the tumor. Such cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of tumor cells that are thought to initiate and sustain tumor formation. More recently, characteristics of stem cells have also been observed in metastatic cancer cells, and it has been suggested that CSCs might play a crucial role in the metastatic process as such. Intriguingly, first evidence has been provided that the metastatic spread of specific CSCs is driven by chemokine signaling. Thus it is possible that chemokine-mediated CSC regulation might be a general feature of metastasis formation.

Abstract

Chemokines regulate proliferation and migration of various types of normal stem and progenitor cells, including precursor cells of neuroectodermal origin. Based on this it is conceivable that the established role of chemokines in cancer cell proliferation and organ-specific metastasis might also be associated with stem cell-like cells present in the tumor. Such cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of tumor cells that are thought to initiate and sustain tumor formation. More recently, characteristics of stem cells have also been observed in metastatic cancer cells, and it has been suggested that CSCs might play a crucial role in the metastatic process as such. Intriguingly, first evidence has been provided that the metastatic spread of specific CSCs is driven by chemokine signaling. Thus it is possible that chemokine-mediated CSC regulation might be a general feature of metastasis formation.

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7 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2009
Deposited On:03 Feb 2009 07:49
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:55
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1044-579X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.semcancer.2008.11.003
PubMed ID:19084599

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